PODCASTS

How To Excel In A Design Build Process

How To Excel In A Design Build Process

 

Kip hosts Shannon Linker who is the Vice President of Sales at Metal Sales Manufacturing Corporation.

Shannon takes us through her design build sales process and how her products help the residential, commercial and agriculture industries. We also discuss how Concora’s submittal functionality will help optimize Metal Sales’ ability to present their products to AEC’s and increase specification.

 


 

 

Podcast Participants:

Graham: Product Director Concora
Kip Rapp: CEO Concora
Shannon Linker: VP Commercial Sales Metal Sales Manufacturing Corp

 

 

Graham:

Hello, everyone and welcome to the Concora Corner, a podcast dedicated to bringing you interviews with folks in the AEC and BPM industry. I’m one of your hosts, Graham Waldrop, a Director of Product here at Concora. Today on the show, we’re talking with Shannon Linker, who’s the Vice President of Sales at one of the most venerable manufacturers of metal roofing walls and building systems in the country, Metal Sales Manufacturing Corporation. Shannon takes us through her design build sales process and how metal sales manufacturing’s products help the residential, commercial and agricultural industries. We also discuss how Concora’s metal functionality will help optimize Metal Sales’ ability to present their products to AECs in increased specification. We hope you enjoy today’s interview with Shannon. But before we begin, here’s a quick word from our CEO Kip Rapp.


Kip:

I wanted to thank everyone again for listening to our podcast. And if you’re interested in knowing more about Concora, we help building product manufacturers get specified and purchase more by providing a great lab experience that’s bolted onto your website, makes it easy for your architects, engineers and contractors to do business online with you. We sum it up as three things. It’s providing a good web experience, good content and good tools. And we have some great tools such as submittals, sustainability, project showcases or anything else needed by your design community to specify and purchase products. We’d be more than happy to show you a quick demo. And you can go to concora.com, to learn more, read case studies and see how other customers have grown sales with our partnership.


Shannon Linker:

Well, my name is Shannon Linker. And I’m the Vice President of commercial sales and technical services, which includes engineering for Metal Sales Manufacturing Corp.

 

Kip:

Yeah, and it’s not often I meet people with both sales and technical services. So I think a lot of people know what sales does. But can you walk us through what technical services mean?

 

Shannon Linker:

Sure. So as a company, we offer services that include shop drawings, drafting, detailing, and engineering, so design support, and that group of people that we have doing those jobs falls under what we call a technical resource services group. And that’s under my umbrella.

 

Kip:

Oh, awesome. And so is that more towards if you’re trying to win a project, or if you’re in a project, then your services, it’s certainly helped further the collaboration and the solutioning, and I would imagine help with the sale or with the delivery of what you’re doing?

 

Shannon Linker:

Certainly. A lot of times, and especially with the design build contractor delivery method that we’re going to talk a little bit about, those folks need support for drawings, or they might need some support around how do they figure out a specific application. And so that requires technical expertise and engineering, so really an extension of an engineer and architect from that vantage point.

 

Kip:

And is that, would you say balanced across the whole, like pre sales and fulfillment and delivery and construction? Or are you more focused on the pre sales, not the win work?

 

Shannon Linker:

It’s both. So we do quite a bit in the pre-sale process. And that could be during the design phase. That could be during a bid, and then all the way through construction. So once that job becomes a real project, we would have those same resources plugging in with the sales team to support the actual contract documents, and then the delivery of the product.

There are times when we might get involved with warranties that require follow up inspections. So all the way through the final construction where we might be out of the job site with those same drawings we created, checking things off, making sure everything was done properly. And really, again it’s being part of that team, that contractor team that’s delivering the finished product from design through construction to the owner.


Kip:

Your company, I know you introduced yourself, Shannon. Could you walk us through a little bit of what your company makes and the type of projects that you’re in?


Shannon Linker:

You bet. So we are a metal roofing and siding manufacturer. So we make the exterior building components, not only the panels, but all of the pieces that go together to make a system. As a company, we’ve been manufacturing across the U.S. for just over 58 years. So family owned business, been around a long time and we’re in 17 locations right now.


Kip:

That’s awesome. Yeah, I talked to a few people, family owned businesses from first generation. There was actually two companies that were fourth generation. So with this business, is it a generational business? And any kind of insights on working at a family owned business too?


Shannon Linker:

It is. We are second generation leading the company, with a few third generations coming up through the ranks now. So I will say, this is the first time I’ve been in a family owned business. I’ve been here four years, and it’s been a great experience for a big company. Having a large company footprint, it’s nice to have ownership where we are nimble, we have easy access, we make quick decisions. So it’s really helped from a growth perspective. But we certainly are on a growth path right now. And that’s part of that fun, I would say.


Kip:

Yeah, with metal roofing and siding, so is that a mix between commercial and residential?


Shannon Linker:

Commercial, residential, and agricultural is another big segment for us.


Kip:

Oh, great, yeah. Well, thanks for that background. And as we talked earlier, you have these, I guess project delivery methodologies in our prep calls. And you were mentioning the popularity of design build, and definitely wanted to kind of go over that with maybe our listeners and one, what was there before design build? Because I know if it’s design bid build, or through these other methodologies, and then what is design build? And why is that different and maybe more popular?


Shannon Linker:

Design build delivery method is one that is currently growing quite rapidly. It’s a, I would say, a method that’s meeting the needs of the owner audience that’s out there more effectively. And so if you think about design bid build, it involves more parties to complete a contract, takes longer to complete. So the design build model has been growing and is probably around well, I would say what I’ve seen or read is about 40% of the total construction market now. And it’s growing very quickly. So we’re seeing it push past that.


Shannon Linker:

One of the key things that really, I think, is a benefit. And there’s a lot of information out on the design build model, but one is the speed and the single contract responsibility. Having one party involved with everything from start to finish, the design through the construction of a project can be facilitated much more quickly. The reports out there in the market show it’s 33.5% faster than a typical design bid build construction model. So that’s really key for how we look at the audience that we’re dealing with, and that customer and what they’re thinking about the design build contractor. They’re presenting a model that’s speed, and in some cases, less cost. But we look at that and how we line up and what do our services, what do our products need to do to keep up with that? So that’s a key focus for us right now and one of the things that we’ve been working on as part of our strategies to differentiate.


Kip:

It’s a more collaborative, it looks like process and is it with the design build? I know there might be multiple ways this happens, but is it the building owner, and then they work with a general contractor that then manages the whole design process at that point? And I know when we talked before it seemed then once the GC’s in there, it’s a very collaborative kind of iterative process where it’s less maybe waterfall.


Shannon Linker:

And what we see in the design build model is that a design build contractor will have those architect engineering services under their umbrella and then they also tend to self-perform on a lot of the disciplines. So they are really truly that one entity that’s handling what used to be multiple contracts.

Now as you think about going through different businesses to hand things off and make decisions, so definitely streamlines that down to a single party and that’s the company that we deal with typically, is that design build contractor. That would be our customer.


Kip:

That’s cool, yeah. And I’m thinking because I’m not as familiar here Shannon, so I’m thinking about a team. And I’m like, okay, design bid build. The first person in the team is the one I’m working with, and then when I get past that, then I work with the second person in the team, might be the engineer, the GC. And so on in the case of design build, is that where, are you saying then the team is already mostly there at the beginning? Or are they still doing that same approach where they have to bring the team in later? How does that work?


Shannon Linker:

So that design build firm is all one company. So they have the design staff on in their company. They have everyone present at the beginning, designing that project with the owner. And that same company with additional resource people, people in their business would be handing off to the next phase of the construction. So let’s say we go from design, we then go into some pricing contracts, and then it would go to construction planning and permits. And so everything is handled by that single entity. It’s all under one company, typically. But they have all those different disciplines in the same business.


Kip:

Got you. And again, I’m just not knowing this Shannon, because some of that I hear is okay, well, if they have all the team members there, is it as competitive? Like when you bid this stuff out, you’d normally assume competition versus having a team. So have you seen the quality is still at that same level and they’re not charging a lot of money for something because it’s their team already?


Shannon Linker:

No, that’s a good point, Kip. I would say what we’ve seen, what we experience is that when there’s a design bid build project, there tends to be less connections at the front end, on the planning on the sequencing, the things that are going to happen. So that creates more cost. Once a project starts going, there’s things that are missed. And then there can also be delays and finger pointing, which can create cost issues. So really upfront, the design build contractor might be making more money on the design, but at the end of the day, the owners save money. And that’s really key and what we’ve seen with some of the successes in this type of work.

 

Kip:

That’s awesome. Yeah, it just makes sense that if you’re faster, 33.5, so I’d like the 0.5 in there. So you’re a third faster, it just seems good, because it just means there’s so many intrinsic improvements that are happening from collaboration and efficiency. And why isn’t it not then less expensive? I guess, because it’s faster, it seems more efficient. So logically, I would say maybe it’s cheaper too or less expensive.


Shannon Linker:

I’m not sure exactly how you would compare specific types of projects. But I would say dependent upon the type of owner, the job gets built faster. If it’s a revenue producing company, that’s going to be valuable to that owner. Just getting projects done with some of the cost delays and the things that can create cost for an owner during a project, that’s going to save them money. So I think there’s multiple benefits when it comes to cost and what that overall outcome’s going to be. I don’t know if that answered your question or not.


Kip:

No, that’s great. I know it’s maybe not the easiest question to answer. And with the design build folks, do you see, you alluded to maybe there’s less change orders too. Is that your experience where since it’s more collaborative, there’s just I don’t know what the standard is for change orders. I heard anything from 20% to 25% of the project but is that what you’ve seen?


Shannon Linker:

We can and I would say that the one thing we’ve experienced with the design build contractors, that when something does change, they give that information to a company like us as a manufacturer in a very concise way in that the change happens very quickly. When we have that change, whether it’s us asking for change or the site asking for change, if it has to go back through multiple channels, it takes more time. So we might be sitting waiting as a manufacturer. And that change information is not coming back and we’re losing time, the customer’s losing time on the job. So it definitely is more streamlined, it’s more cost contained dealing with a single entity, for sure.


Kip:

That’s great. And as you mentioned, it just sounds much faster, more collaborative. Is there what you would say you mentioned it’s 40% of projects nowadays, was the kind of adoption to this more challenged because people are just so used to design bid build, and then changing kind of the mentality to go into a design build model? My question is more on the doctrine of why isn’t it like 70% or 80%?


Shannon Linker:

Sure. It’s not very old. There’s an organization that’s an independent group that represents the design build community, and they’re five years old at this point. When you compare that to a number of other kind of construction industry driven independent organizations, it’s still relatively new. It’s a methodology that has just grown, I think more significantly in the last few years. So it’s still growing. And I would say we’d see those numbers jump up in the next few years.


Kip:

That’s awesome. Well, good stuff there. So as you mentioned, you work heavily into the design build process. So I imagine there’s a lot of upfront collaboration with the building owner, and then the potential GCs. And it sounds like you’ve established a really good practice around that. So can you kind of walk us through what your company does, and how you’re able to make that a really good experience?


Shannon Linker:

Well, one of the things that I would say has been beneficial for us is having people that are technical resources. So we’ve focused on the AEC community quite a bit in the past and of that, so AEC being architects, engineers, and contractors, contractors being the design build contractor, so we have those relationships. And we focused on those with our people resources. So we reach out to them. We have conversations on jobs that they’re working on, and we promote information on our website.


Shannon Linker:

But one of the challenges we found is that as these design build contractors are working on jobs, where their customers, their owner customers are looking for quick delivery, and that’s their value proposition to that owner is quicker, get that building up, get it all done. We can’t respond fast enough with people. So that’s been a challenge for us. And we have two concerns. One is how do we provide that information in a good way, but also doing it effectively, having that information, which is very technically oriented, organized in a way that that customer can find it easily and they can use it effectively. So that’s one thing that we talk about a lot, we think about a lot with these audiences, design build as well as architects and engineers.


Kip:

In that case, as you mentioned, you are developing relationships across this AEC community. And I think from a marketing and sales or business development, it appears that they may be working on projects. I’m assuming they’re part of this design build group, that they work under.

And it sounds like when you have a connection, now they’re looking for speed. And you’re saying that’s one of the challenges is providing them with an agile approach of meeting their specific objectives or requirements or other things that we’re trying to do. Does that sound what, I think that’s what I was hearing what you’re saying.


Shannon Linker:

That’s correct. It’s just hard to think about the amount of information. When we deal with some of these folks, there’s a lot of back and forth. And sometimes they know what they want. And if it’s getting a person to respond to that, that’s just an available resource when they can be available. And that doesn’t always work consistently. And then there’s the website, which has data. And so we then rely on the end user to find what they need on our site. And sometimes that works pretty well, because they can search and they’re pretty adept at that these days. But yeah, so we think about how we can do a better job there, how we can speed that process up and keep them moving. And so that’s one thing we’ve been continuing to work on to really set ourselves apart from the other manufacturers.


Kip:

Yeah, that’s really cool. So it sounds like they’re looking for speed from business owner, and then they’re expecting speed and efficiency and quality from their partners like you. And part of that is having people available to meet those needs. And because of it, it appears to be a more collaborative design process upfront. So I’m sure that’s a little more complicated, with a lot more collaboration. And then it sounds like what you’re saying is the content that they need for that needs to be also fast and efficient and easy to find and easy to use. Is that about right?


Shannon Linker:

That is, that is, and in addition to our external audience, the contractors and the architects and engineers that rely on us for that type of support, we also have our salespeople. So we talked a little bit earlier, I manage sales, so one of the groups that I have to think about is how we support them with tools and resources and how they’re supporting this contractor base as well. And as we continue to grow as a company, and we think about all the products and how that technical information is organized, I’m very focused on how do we make sure that our teams understand it and can use it as a tool. So if they are the person that that architect or design build contractor gets a hold of, and that person’s saying, “Hey, I need this information right now.” Our team has to be able to go into our system or onto our own website and say, “Okay, here you go.” And I don’t think we do that very well. I mean as a company with a lot of products, we have a lot of great solutions, but it’s hard to package that sometimes and provide it to people easily.

 

Kip:

Yeah, no, got you on that, and with your contractors as they look towards your ability to be agile, you mentioned that as a differentiation, Shannon. So is that mainly the challenge with maybe some of your peers is that they can’t react as fast or as collaborative or consultative with either the people, the insights, solving the problems? I guess that’s what I’m getting out of what you’re saying.


Shannon Linker:

Sure, sure. If by peers, you mean salespeople.


Kip:

Yeah, sales or business development, whoever’s really working with the folks or your technical folks that are there helping out.


Shannon Linker:

You bet. Well, and it’s interesting because everyone’s remote. It’s not like we’re all in the same building like we used to be back in the day, and even more so in the last year. So thinking about how we’re organized digitally, how we share information, how we train new people that come in to our business, it’s really important to me that we are able to present information in a really logical, easy to understand, easy to find information way.


Kip:

Good stuff. Yeah, and I wanted to go back to one of your earlier comments, Shannon when you talked about how you really are adapted to design build, and it looks like it’s a best in class methodology that makes everyone’s lives easier. It’s faster, it’s more efficient. Do you have maybe an example you can walk our listeners through how that worked out and worked out well?


Shannon Linker:

We deal with a number of different contractors now that we’ve evolved with, I would say. And one of those is a company called ARCO/Murray. A bit of their focus is in the self-storage construction market. And one of the things that happened as self-storage took off in the last year, we collaborated with them and shared more information around our drafting and detailing resources and their team of in house people that were currently providing those services to their customer, their owner customers. They were tapped out. They didn’t have enough staff to support the volume and the growth that they were experiencing.

So knowing that we had that as an available resource, they leveraged our team when they had capacity issues. So that’s been a very collaborative win-win situation with us and one of our bigger contractor customers.


Kip:

And are you saying that that’s not as easy to do in a design bid build?


Shannon Linker:

In terms of finding additional resources?


Kip:

Yeah, that collaboration with your team, and I don’t know if this was in the design process, or where in the process this was.


Shannon Linker:

So this was moving into the construction phase. As a company, they had the design done, so they didn’t need our help with the collaboration on which product do we use? How do we apply it? That type of thing. We were at a point where we were a little bit further down the process with them. And they ran into challenges with providing shop drawings and bill of materials to keep everything moving. So think about the aspect that we talked about. Speed for them is critical. They’ve made a commitment on a contract with a date with that customer. And now they’ve got a bottleneck in their shop drawing process. So as a manufacturer, we have shop drawing capabilities. So we plugged into their team and provided that as an additional support resource. So we kept them moving, the speed situation was-


Kip:

They were at 35%, right instead of 30?


Shannon Linker:

Right, right. Well, and it’s interesting because our speed of doing those things was different than their speed. So we learned some things too. We realized that if we’re going to be part of really supporting that type of customer, we have to think differently. We have to respond differently. And we had to go a lot faster.


Kip:

Yeah, that’s cool. So it sounds like because of this design, you can let me know if this is right or not, but because you had this design build process, this collaborative process upfront, then they knew you already and you’re the manufacturer, and then you’re able to collaborate with them to help them with things that are more downstream.


Shannon Linker:

Correct. So that’s definitely a situation where having the relationship already, having that knowledge of each other’s business has really paid off for both of us. And I think one of the things that we’re trying to think about and package differently for ourselves is to really get that out on our website, make sure that companies know we have those capabilities that we advocate around them. So that’s a little bit of the work we’re doing behind the scenes was our marketing.


Kip:

That’s awesome. That sounds great. And you were alluding to earlier, Shannon, the importance of the digital component. And certainly, I don’t want to talk too much about what we do, but it came out that both from your employees and then from your digital website, the importance of your persona of being quick, collaborative and efficient, the ability to provide the right content at the right time that’s not barred. So can you walk us through a little more about the tenets of kind of that. Is it website? Is it the content. I know there’s just the people involved, as you mentioned. But if you could spend a little more time there on the importance of that, what is important for then your customers from a digital side?


Shannon Linker:

I’d say what’s important there, Kip. So let’s take ARCO for example. If we’re working with their team, they come to our website, and they’re looking for something for a submittal. So we’ve got a job with them. And they’re trying to put the package together and get all the right documents assembled, a job like what they do would require possibly drawings downloaded from our site, if we’re not providing them. They would require some product flyers, some specification documents. So all of that information is in different formats. And we put it out on our website in a variety of ways currently.


Shannon Linker:

As you know, we’re working with your company to organize and how do I say this, an experience that’s easy to find, but also allow the user to understand going in how to pick and choose things. Our current libraries of information are quite broad. There’s not much elegance to how someone can put something together as well as select what they need. So I’m excited about where we’re headed with putting additional capability onto our site through your solution. It definitely is going to up our game and save not only our customer’s time.

I touched earlier on the aspect of our salespeople and the folks in our team that use information for their processes. And sometimes the customer doesn’t go to our site. Sometimes they go to our sales rep and say, “We need this, this and this.” And our folks spend a bit of time pulling things together, downloading things, trying to assemble them in an organized way. What we see with your solution, it’s going to change that dramatically. We’re excited about that.


Kip:

Yeah. Well, we’re excited too, and we’re excited to help you in your ability to be kind of like just in time in automation. And we do see from our data with the design community that the digital experience is hugely important. And we actually work with a lot of customers. They’re like yeah, it’s tough to find your content and let alone to do a submittal. You have to call someone up. And then on the other side, we have building material customers who are like, “Yeah, the submittal is really hard because it’s sitting at the desk, or it’s in the trash can, and then this is on SharePoint. And it takes a long time.” And some of our customers just have people that kind of feel sorry, because they’re the person that has to put this together, and they’re like, going around your office to figure out where the documents are.


Shannon Linker:

Right. Hopefully, they don’t get sick knows how to do it.


Kip:

Yeah, it’s certainly one of the reasons we’re happy is that we’re able to make people’s lives not being certainly make your customers happy, because then you’re doing things faster, and they’re doing things faster. And I was curious about the submittal that you talked about. And these are things that we get some insights talking to contractors, but when you see people putting submittals together, I assume it’s very diverse in whatever they need and their submittal just kind of depends on that particular project.


Shannon Linker:

Quite often, and where we really need to shore up in this area, it’s the commercial customer commercial type projects. Typically, the minimum is the product information and supporting drawing. So that alone is quite a bit of content. So just looking at cut sheets of information on the product itself, and then all of the supporting drawings, the details, the things, the components put everything together with the panel piece itself. It’s not just, you can’t just put a roof panel up, you have to have coverings for all the openings and all the edge conditions. So it’s all those separate details for all those conditions that becomes very laborious on a website to piece all that together.

 

Kip:

They may just call you up or they just don’t use your products I would imagine.


Shannon Linker:

Right.


Kip:

Yeah, and I see that with other customers or companies, at least Shannon where someone will do a submittal to bid your products. Do you have full knowledge that at times or maybe sometimes you don’t, and it’s like a potential business, I would assume. Has that happened?


Shannon Linker:

The different ways that people come into our system, whether it’s through a phone call or the website. Maybe it’s organic, where they’ve already specified us before, and they don’t even call us up. They just repeat that specification. In an architectural firm, that’s pretty common. So we don’t always have visibility to a project before it’s designed and out for bid. And I think, as we think about how we’re providing a better way to reach these folks, and the audience that we’re talking about, they want a better experience. And when they start working with us and seeing that everything’s there, it’s organized a certain way, we expect them to come back. And then we would expect to be able to track them, because then they’ll be hitting our site with your tool as well. We’ll be tracking all of that activity. And that’s really important for our business too, to be able to see trends, to see what’s happening, where things are dropping off geographically, where they’re picking up. So that’s really an exciting part of the solution that we’re looking forward to as well.


Kip:

Yeah, that’s great. Yeah, I really certainly believe in that myself. We know that when you bring people to your website, you got to have things there for them. You don’t want them to get mad or angry that it just takes 100 clicks. And then when you have a system where it’s easy to find, it can help do a submittal, it has the content that you need in your design build process for your customers or your people. Then the other challenge is making sure people know that you have that on your website, and that kind of marketing partnership. And then you mentioned something earlier, Shannon with the salespeople and I hear this sometimes with other customers and companies, Shannon, where they have kind of a sales enablement challenge of creating proposals or documents and you being in sales, and I don’t know if that’s a marketing thing, it may be something that you have a lot of knowledge is, is that something you see as a challenge too, where if you are giving a proposal or some kind of I don’t know if they’re called submittals or proposals where you’re trying to win business, so does that happen?


Shannon Linker:

Absolutely. So on the front end, and we call that the front end of the process, if it’s in a bid phase, or even just proposal for draft quoting, just getting budget numbers is sometimes what the owners or architects will do. Our sales team spends a bit of time trying to assemble data for those, and it takes away from the selling process. But we believe that front end, pre bid, pre design is the most important phase. We need to invest there. Because if we don’t, we won’t be that preferred brand. We won’t be getting more at bats when the job is actually going through to construction. So we believe that we need to spend time there, but I want to minimize the amount of time it takes a salesperson to actually deliver what someone needs. It needs to be fluid; it needs to be fast. And they need to focus on closing sales as well.


Kip:

Closing and really finding the differentiation versus doing all the paperwork. Right?


Shannon Linker:

Right.


Kip:

Yeah, I was talking to some other company, not customer but they’re like yeah, this takes a long time to do these. We could do more of these a day would probably win more business. And that was an interesting point. And that kind of process, Shannon, what’s the anatomy of that? I know it has to look professional. Is it a PowerPoint deck? Is it like a Word doc with product info and some photos? But is there like some kind of framework that you guys have?


Shannon Linker:

Not professionally organized and disseminated throughout the company. We do have specific documents we use but we don’t require everyone to follow the same method every time. I would say the difficulty is just what you said earlier, Kip, which is these jobs vary and so what people need for their specific submittal will be different but overall, we have a quote template. We have a transmittal form. We have some of those kinds of basic things. Typically, it’s not in a PowerPoint. It’s a package of information that goes out digitally in an email typically. So definitely room for improvement and opportunity there. I think we’ll see some of that as we implement your solution. And there’s one other point too I was going to make about the sales process is that when we think about once a job is bid, I was putting a lot of emphasis on the pre bid, pre design phase. But when a job does bid, we also have our sales folks and their processes doing those submittals to get that job ready to order. So it just continues. So they start at the beginning with some of that hand holding with one party. And then the job gets awarded to a contractor. And they spend even more time trying to fill in and make sure they’ve got the updated final submittal done.


Kip:

And that’s cool. And is that a scenario Shannon, where you’re chasing the design build work, but there’s multiple GCs that potentially could win the work? So you have to then work with those multiple GCs to make sure you’re in all those? Is that the idea?


Shannon Linker:

Before it’s awarded, yes. There would be potentially multiple bids going out. But once it’s a job, it’s a single submittal to that particular design build contractor.


Kip:

And in those situations where maybe the GC that wins that, are you already a chosen manufacturer at that point? Would that be ideal I would imagine that you’re there already and you supplied them with submittals already? Or is that something that happens later?


Shannon Linker:

It varies based on whether or not the project was open bid. So multiple GCs until that contract’s awarded. We would be talking with various parties trying to confirm who’s awarded. But those open bid projects are in multiple manufacturers too. So there’s other folks that we’re competing with trying to confirm who’s got the work and who’s going to ultimately land the contract.


Kip:

Yeah, but it sounds like in your process though, you’re already hopefully engaged with the architects of that GC, and the engineers or the contractors, so that you’re having that kind of, I guess, team approach to collaborate so that everyone’s saying, “Oh, yeah, use our products versus someone else’s.”


Shannon Linker:

Sure. Typically, we are. When we’re not specified, that can be a challenge. And I guess that brings up another point on just how we deliver information and how we get it out there quickly. If we’re not specified in a job that’s out for bid, we go through a process, it’s called a substitution and approval. So we have to then submit our information just like we would on a project that we were already specified on. Again, it’s pulling all that data together quickly and presenting it to someone in a substitution requests. So delivery and organization around that information, again is something that we’re looking forward to building on and improving our experience for the users with your software.


Kip:

That is awesome. Well again, thank you for your time. It’s been fun. And Graham and I, we’re definitely excited to get this published and we’ll send it out to you and looking forward to talk to you again, Shannon.


Shannon Linker:

Awesome. Thanks, guys. Appreciate the opportunity to chat about design build.


Graham:

All right, folks. That wraps us up for today’s show. So you can find our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and SoundCloud by searching for The Concora Corner. And if you’d like to, we’d love a rating and a short review if you wish on Apple. Any feedback is appreciated on any of our shows that are coming out and/or just the show in general or if you just want to say hello. You can find out more about Concora and our services at www.concora.com. We are on Facebook at facebook.com/concorallc. We are on Twitter @Concora and you can find us on LinkedIn at linkedin.com/company/concora. Thanks for listening and have a great day.

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