PODCASTS

Creating An Excellent Sales Process

Creating An Excellent Sales Process

Kip and Graham interview Dale Kruse, Area Sales Manager for Allura. We discuss Dale’s sales process and how his experience in the field has helped him create a sales process that’s firm but flexible and very successful.

We also discuss the ins and outs of fiber concrete and why it is the top solution when remodeling or building homes.



 

Podcast Participants:

Graham: Product Director Concora
Kip Rapp: CEO Concora
Dale Kruse: Area Sales Manager Allura

 

Graham:

Hello everyone. And welcome to the Concora Corner. I’m your host Graham Waldrep. And today we’re talking with Dale Kruse, who’s the greater Area Sales Manager out in Washington State for Allura, who sells Fiber Cement for remodeling and building homes. Dale also goes into great detail about his sales process and how he builds a core foundation of what it takes to be successful and he disseminates that to his crew, but how he’s also able to take into account everybody’s personality. Their work schedules, and their tendencies. And is able to mold and binge that process into a cohesive whole that allows everybody to be successful.

We try to do the same thing at Concora on the product side, in the sense that we have a core foundation of rules and practices that we need to adhere to. But we also have a wide variety of folks who wear a lot of different hats and are responsible for a lot of different things, and have different work styles. So it’s a great challenge of how do you build this core foundation of how things should be run but also be able to take into account the strengths and weaknesses of your team. How can you bend your rules a little bit so that everybody benefits from that and you’re still performing at a high level when everybody is as happy as they can be.

It’s a hell of a challenge. And Dale goes through it in depth here in terms of how he’s able to execute it to perfection out in Washington State. So without further ado, let’s get into the interview, but first a quick word from Kip.

 

Kip:

I wanted to thank everyone again for listening to our podcast. If you’re interested in knowing more about Concora, we help building product manufacturers get specified and purchase more by providing a great web experience that’s bolted onto your website. It makes it easy for your architects, engineers, and contractors to do business online with you. We sum it up as three things. It’s providing a good web experience, good content and good tools. And we have some great tools such as submittals, sustainability, project showcases or anything else needed by our design community to specify and purchase products.

 

We’d be more than happy to show you a quick demo and you can go to concora.com to learn more, read case studies and see how other customers have grown sales with our partnership. Yeah. Hey, Dale, thanks for joining our Concora Podcast, really appreciate the time. And I know when we were talking a few weeks ago, it was just really impressive just learning about your products and your Fiber Cement siding, and really look forward to showing what our listeners can learn about your experience and your wealth of knowledge, and would love to hear who you are, Dale, and what your company does and what makes your products great versus other folks.

 

Dale Kruse:

I’m the Area Sales Manager for Pacific Northwest for Allura Fiber Cement. I coach my team how to sell my products most effectively, and I’m also in the field doing sales. So I’m kind of a dual purpose guy in that respect.

 

Kip:

Yeah. Yeah. So you’re like a player coach and that’s awesome. I know, definitely I respect a lot of folks, I can want only just build great teams and be a great leader, but can also be there to help mentor and coach. It’s definitely, I’d say a dying art nowadays where you can really show by example and it sounds like that’s what you’re doing.

 

Dale Kruse:

Yeah. It’s definitely what I do. The player coach, I mean, there’s a reason why there aren’t a lot of player coaches in the NFL. Because it’s hard to coach from the field and you can’t see everything that’s going on.

 

Kip:

Yeah.

 

Dale Kruse:

So I fully admit that I spend way more time doing administration part of my job, which is frustrating. Because I’ve been a field guy most of my life or whatever most of my career, I guess I’ll say. It’s been a learning process for me going into sales management from being a field sales guy. But yeah, I love it.

 

Kip:

That’s interesting. So as you mentioned, if you’re leading the team and there’s certain amount of overhead like administration, and reporting, and executive meetings, what’s the challenge that you’ve seen? Is it really about time management or is it about how can you coach effectively when you’re not there all the time or not in the field, but can you share any of that?

 

Dale Kruse:

Yeah. I mean, the administrative time… it just takes more administration time, I think. So it’s just not being out in the field in my smaller area that I just cover for myself, but I have to be able to still react to the needs of my team in a timely manner. That’s the whole thing. So I guess, yeah, it is time management, but it’s also knowing communication wise, how to communicate to your team, “Hey, I’m going to be busy during these times.” So we have connected calendar that we use, it’s a great tool, I think. Man, it’s nothing, I think it’s just outlook.

You’ll find as we go through this that I am not the best computer guy out there. There’s a lot of tools that are available at least that I’ve been able to find and use to help my team know that they’ll get an answer after I’m done with a meeting. Because that’s just kind of the rules. I set the expectations early on how my management style is, which is really not a micro-managing. I want my people to be successful and come to me with questions for sure. But if anybody’s been in a sales job, I’ve sold a lot of different things over the years and I can just tell you that the sales process is really similar for most products. So for me, it’s just a matter of, “Guys, here’s the process that we’re going to use…” Especially if I just hired a new person in one of my areas and it’s just going through, “Here’s the process, let’s work on this together.” And then being able to track those steps to coach them up or mentor them into how to be successful with the products that we have to sell.

 

Graham:

Dale, do you think that evolved from your own time when you were more so just strictly in the field in terms of wanting to give your folks sort of some leeway there in terms of getting used to the process and executing the process?

 

Dale Kruse:

Absolutely. I have a unique skill set I’ve got. I know that my team is probably, if they ever hear this are going to cringe when I say that… I have a bunch of kids. Not that I don’t treat my team as kids, but having seven kids you learn about different personalities and how to manage that personality to be their best self, their best whatever.

 

If they’re going to be the best wrestler or the best cross-country runner, the best computer programmer whatever it is. I might not understand, like my youngest son is a computer programmer. I have no idea what he’s doing. It makes me nervous every time he gets around one of my computers and there’s a screen that I’ve never seen before.

So I have no idea what he’s doing, but I know that he is excellent at what he does. We just follow a process, “Look, if you want to go this direction, you want to go into computer programming, then in school you take classes that are going to get you to your goal.” And so in Sales, we all have… we used to call them quotas, they’re not called quotas anymore. They’re called the budgets now because that’s a nicer word. But, “Here’s your budget that you need to hit,” whether it’s for average selling price, ASP or volume or margin, whatever it is, “Hey, here’s our goal. This is the best way I think we can get there. How are we going to use our sales process to get to those goals?”

A more succinct way to answer your question is, absolutely. My field experience in dealing with different styles of people managing me to take those lessons and say, “Okay, this really frustrated me when this was happening with my manager in the past. So how can I make sure that I don’t frustrate my team so that they’re unhappy.” Because happy sales guys sell more, is my typical experience.

 

Graham:

Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. So what does that structure actually look like in terms of how you set up your team day-to-day responsibilities, things like that in terms of trying to build something that is successful?

 

Dale Kruse:

Really, for where I live, it’s geography. In the West… Where are you guys by the way? Sorry that I don’t know this already.

 

Kip:

We’re in Atlanta. Yeah. Both of us. Yeah.

 

Dale Kruse:

Okay. I mean, there’s some major differences between the way that the East coast is, the West coast. Here just because of population density… Okay. My kids live in Atlanta or one of my kids lives in Atlanta. I mean, you guys, there’s people everywhere over there.

 

It’s crazy to me, how many people are over there. I know that there’s areas you can get out away from the Atlanta area and there’s areas where you have a little more space and there’s not as many people. In the West, especially Washington, Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, you might have a four hour drive between stops, between the actual customers that you could call on or builders, or dealers, or distribution, whatever it is. That’s how I train.

I try and manage our guy’s territory by taking a look at the geography. And it helps of course, because I’ve been in this area so long I kind of understand a four hour drive in Seattle or Portland, for example, or 20 mile drive in Portland or Seattle might take you an hour. Whereas a 20 mile drive in Bozeman or Billings, unless you hit the time off is going to take you 15 minutes. But to get from Billings to Bozeman or Bozeman to Billing wherever, it’s going to take you an hour and a half.

So I try and set my territory up just based a lot on geography. I split Seattle into a couple of different markets. Portland is a different market than the rest of Oregon. Then you have Eastern Washington, that’s how I do it. I try and make it so that it doesn’t necessarily have to be equitable because you can play with the numbers a little bit as far as budgets to match the market. But it’s hard if you set it a KPI, for example of, “Hey, you have to make seven calls a day and enter them into Salesforce.” Well, that guy in Seattle, it’s not going to happen. He’s going to have a really effective day. He’s going to be able to land five maybe appointments in a day. It’s just different. Whereas the guy in Billings, he can make eight calls in eight hours, pretty much and not break a sweat.

So it’s one of those things where you got to look at the quality of the calls that they’re going to make. There’s going to be certain types of customers that are going to take longer time. If you’ve got a custom builder, for example, you’re going to spend more time with that guy because he’s going to buy a higher ASP products, average selling price products, higher price products. He’s going to build fewer homes so you’re going to spend the time up front with him, and then he’s only going to call you when he needs you. Yes, you’re going to follow up but typically those follow-ups can be once a quarter with that guy and he’s going to be happy. In Seattle that might just take longer. It’s just different.

 

Kip:

Yeah. No, it makes sense, Dale. And yeah, I really appreciate your comment on managing or adapting your management style based on the personalities and people that you have. 10 kids is a phenomenon.

Dale Kruse:

Yeah. It’s only seven.

 

Kip:

Oh, seven.

 

Dale Kruse:

Yeah. Yeah.

 

Kip:

So you’re going to plan to have more kids there?

 

Dale Kruse:

No. Yeah. No, I’ve got grandkids now. I’m doing good.

 

Kip:

Yeah. You said something about a sales methodology. I was just curious on both of those things. So you’re matching up a good sales methodology, which I’m sure is a bit foundational to whoever is on your team, but then how you make a person successful to their budget will be based on their personality, what they’re good at, what you need to coach on and then your management style. So could you go over that a little more and maybe… What’s an example of a management style? Because you mentioned you run into seven of them or five yourself. Yeah. Any good examples there from your team and then on the sales methodology, what in general is your sales methodology?

 

Dale Kruse:

Well, mine is somewhere between control freak, I don’t know the exact term of that and complete laissez-faire right.

 

Kip:

Yeah.

 

Dale Kruse:

So hands-off, or it’s somewhere in the middle of those. And once again, it really depends on the guy that you’re managing or girl, lady, a woman, that you’re managing.

 

Kip:

Yeah.

 

Dale Kruse:

Because you’ll get a guy that is really… I’ve had this experience very recently where you’ve got a person that is super high excitement, but they are really suck at paperwork. I mean, to the point where they let things drop through the cracks that are actually important steps of the process. So it’s one of those things. I’m not going to say my sales process because I have learned it. Over the last 20 years, I’ve learned the sales process just through reading books. My sales process isn’t anything new, in my opinion. It’s just tips and tricks that I’ve picked up that work for me and my personality. Then I leave it generalized enough to where that sales process can work with any personality.

That’s the best way I can put it. I really believe in having a sales process from soup to nuts all the way through so that if there’s ever a question of, “Hey, I’m at this step and I can’t get past this step.” And you can say, “Oh.” And you can coach or mentor that person to get through that based on their personality. They will find a way and it doesn’t matter if you’re the lowest energy type person in the world. I find that lowest energy people are great on other aspects of the sales process.

You know when I was a contractor, I didn’t try and screw fasteners in with a hammer. I mean, you got to use your tools for what they’re best adapted to. If you’ve got somebody that is not real bunter, because in my opinion, you’ve got hunters and you’ve got gathers and then you got people that are kind of in the middle, as far as salespeople go. And if you’ve got someone that isn’t a real hunter, but they’re good at the other stuff, the paperwork part, setting appointments and they’re just like a plow horse and they just keep going and they don’t hit those peaks and valleys as much as the people, those high energy hunter-type people hit, but they have a constant steady increase. Those are probably the simplest people to manage in my opinion. Because they’ll follow the process.

The hunter gatherer types or the hunter types are high energy, high emotion, which can sometimes be draining things. Thank goodness. I’ve got a mixture of those types of personalities with my kids. So when a problem arises, they’re running around like their hair’s on fire, but really it’s just… they haven’t gotten enough of their sales process because they forgot that they had it. And then, “Oh yeah, that’s right. I got to read that again.” And that’s okay too. You can manage to that selling style, or that personality. It’s just, “Hey look, what’s it say, what’s step three?” Or whatever. “What’s part C of step one.”

 

The sales process that I use, you can literally use it for sales of… I can be selling Fiber Cement, roofing, any building product, I know that this sales process works because I’ve been doing this for long enough to know. I use the same sales process when I was selling jobs as a contractor. It’s brilliant, it’s really a very simple and easy thing to do. It’s about 37 pages long. It seemed like when I was writing it out, but it’s really not that long.

 

Kip:

Yeah. Yeah. No, it makes sense. And I appreciate what you’re saying with… you have a person’s talents. Some people are very excited and outgoing and others are very good at the paperwork. But do you find it that at some point you may have people that are just not fits. So how do you gauge whether a person has enough talent and experience to be successful? Is it according to the budget? Is it according to the overall progression, are they coachable, what’s your kind of way to measure that Dale?

 

Dale Kruse:

Yeah. If I’m looking for a new sales person, I really am looking for more of a personality. If I need somebody that’s going to be good at architectural specs, I know that I’m going to be looking for someone that’s organized, really organized and presents themselves well that doesn’t talk like a refer, like, “Yours truly.” And that can learn the technical details of Fiber Cement, because that’s what I’m selling right now. So it’s one of those things.

I can teach anybody the technical stuff but having the… I don’t know, soft skills is a term I’ve heard bandied about recently. If I can pull those soft skills out during an interview… I do not have a process set up, but just so a set process for an interview, I have some general questions that I go through with every perspective person that I’m looking at to put on my team. It’s really going to be based on that person’s personality. Because  you can’t see that in a phone call or an interview or a resume that’s been emailed to you, right?

 

Graham:

That’s one of the things that… I mean, from what I’m getting from hear you talk about your processes. That it’s a pretty methodical in the sense of that you have a very clear blueprint on how things fit. But you can also be very balanced in terms of being able to get different types of personalities, but still have the core of the process. The foundation is there, which is really great. Which is something that on my end on a product side, we kind of try to do a similar thing where we have a lot of folks who we work a lot with the developer development team.

 

You know we have a lot of different personalities in there and it’s sort of like, “okay, we have a structure of how we’re supposed to do things, but how can we also make sure it’s not a square peg round hole thing, where we can kind of cater to the tendencies of people were still getting results.” And I think that’s important to be flexible there. So I’m definitely relating a lot to what you’re saying there.

 

Dale Kruse:

When I’m interviewing, and it’s funny because we had a regional meeting this morning and one of my team members popped up that, “Hey, when Dale hired me, he told me what I should expect.” I’m a big believer in managing expectations of any situation. I don’t care if it’s with my kids, my personal relationships, my buddies, whatever, to the builders that I call on, the dealers that I call on, my employee, my team, the guys that work with me, even my bosses. I like to manage expectations and where I can, I like to under promise and over deliver. I mean, that just makes you look like Superman every time you actually pull it off. So that’s one thing I think that during the interview process that you can… so you’re not setting someone up for failure.

Number one, you’ll have an idea of a gap or a hole that you have in your team and something that you want to fill. And then you can interview to that objective. That’s your objective to find the solution for this segment. It’s always best to manage those expectations from your team or to your team, or to just tell them what to expect when they come to work at your place. I mean, interviewing is still just another sales job. “I want you to come work for me. So I’m going to explain to you how awesome it is to work for me.”  Different form of sales.

 

Graham:

It’s kind of like the value prop of a website in a way where it’s sort of like, “You’re getting… You should know.” When you’re coming into an interview, when someone’s explained to you, when you know what the job is laying out that core value of what we’re trying to do. Because if that’s left to murky things can definitely get off on the wrong foot there.

 

Dale Kruse:

Right. Well, then it leaves too much open for interpretation. I mean, I hate, well, you said, “Blah, blah.” Whatever it is because it’s one of those things like, “No, when we were talking about this, what I said was, ‘Whatever'” But what they heard was different. So to be clear in your expectations and to manage that I think is critical in every aspect of sales, to be honest with you, it’s the best salesman tool… one of the best salesman tools available. That good time management skills, I think are two huge components to any sales process.

 

Graham:

Has that method translate to working with other folks in other departments like working with product or working with marketing? Does that translate directly in terms of the expectation piece or is it get a little murkier there when you’re doing more work internally outside of Sales?

 

Dale Kruse:

Well, I mean we can talk sales versus marketing all day long. I mean, the thing with managing two with other departments, because obviously they have a totally different chain of command that I have, typically, so managing those types of expectations is… I just like to be very, very clear and succinct with what my expectations are, even if I have to repeat it multiple times, because that happens. I mean, it just does. And if, hopefully, the person that you’re negotiating with, because really it’s just another part of the sales job. I’m just going to use marketing. You’re going to sell marketing on your need, what I need for this area is this piece of whatever, a flyer or some sort of marketing piece, and they’re asking questions about it. When it comes down to, after you got the expectation of what the piece should look like, then you have the expectation of delivery. When is this going to be delivered?

And even if I have to ask 10 times in that meeting for an expected date on when I’ll have that piece of marketing material I’ll get one. I don’t care if it’s six months away and I need it tomorrow, at least I have a date that we can start from. So then from there, for me, it’s a communication thing, which my wife will roll on the floor laughing if she heard me talking about communication, by the way. But communicate the need, get the date and then I follow up with an email summarizing that meeting. Once again, I use that process with a dealer or distributor, my team mates, my direct report, whatever. Because it just leaves less ambiguity in life.

By the way, this is making me sound like I’m very organized. I’m not the most organized guy. But in order to make sure… For me, I set tasks for everything. And so it’s one of those things where as I’m going through and training on my sales process or the sales process that I want my team to use, I should say, it’s one of those things where I’ll go, “Oh yeah, that’s something I need to work on.” There’s always room for improvement in myself, so that hopefully will keep me humble, even though my team would probably roll on the floor laughing if they hear this, when I said that I was humble.

 

Kip:

Well, Dale, I disagree with your wife. I think you’re a great communicator.

 

Dale Kruse:

Yeah. Thank you. I’ll let her know. Make sure that that makes it into the end of this so that I can just repeat it. I’ll just put that one sentence on repeat, over and over on the loop.

 

Kip:

Well, we’ll mail it to your wife.

 

Dale Kruse:

Yeah. There you go. There you go.

 

Kip:

But no, I appreciate that. I hear when you’re talking about skinning, setting expectations and… My background, some of it’s in project management. And it’s certainly a technique where you’re trying to negotiate have some type of relationship in a meeting like marketing, and you’re looking for a partnership where you need them to help you and they need your help and vice versa. And that technique of being able to one listen, and then give expectations and a reason why you need something like in your case that marketing slick or that type of flyer that you mentioned and then just asking.

I run into a lot of salespeople that don’t follow that. And I really do appreciate that summary too, because that’s just… it gives you a voice to tell the story that everyone remembered and probably forgot. And gives you then that voice to set expectations after the meeting and the next steps to… Because either they forgot. They don’t remember or there might’ve been other things in there. That’s definitely something I appreciate for what you’re doing there.

I know part of what we’re talking about, Dale, is to kind of go over more of what you do as a product at Allura, with your Fiber Cement sidings. A lot of our listeners have this challenge to where they’re not necessarily in a category where it’s all about quality or elegance. Sometimes we talk to a lot of people, Dale, which is, oh yeah, they just look at the price. They look at the price. How do you overcome that with your product? Not being like the number one in your space, is it relationship? Is it a technique? Is it about differentiating your product? So could you walk us through a little about that.

 

Dale Kruse:

The way that I go about it, because I’ve been in the building products industry or space, either working with them or selling them for a long time. I do have relationships and they’re a great place to start. So, it doesn’t matter really where the relationships come from. I’ve got a lot of professional relationships in my work. And I’ve developed a fairly good reputation which is, by the way in Sales, is pretty easy to do. All you have to do is pick up your phone and answer emails from your customers and you’ll be about 10 steps ahead of most of the competition. You develop those relationships and those are good ways to get the door open, when you switch products or you’ve got a product that isn’t necessarily the market leader in the segment that you’re in.

But after that, you kind of have to find something to differentiate yourself. If you’re not the market leader your company, how do they go to market? Are they the cheapest guy out there? Hopefully not. I really don’t like selling on price. That’s never been my stick. But there’s a lot of people to do and selling them prices is a way to go to market. There’s no question about it. There’s a lot of companies that do that, and that’s what their plan is and good for them. They should go and work that plan and be successful at it. I think that’s great.

The way I like to do it is to find a differentiator or some differentiator with either the company. It could be the warranty. It could be the company, can be the service level is where I like to land because there is a huge value add to good service. And maybe it’s just the fact that you pick up your phone when you get a phone call. It could be lots of different things as far as the service level. And hopefully you’ve got something that’s different about your product than the other guy that you can capitalize on in order to generate interest in your product.

So, a good example for my products is we have a slightly different profile than our competitors. Our products when they’re painted aesthetically, you can see a difference. So it’s one of those things. Some people like the way my stuff looks, some people like the way their stuff looks after it’s painted. I’m okay with that. I’ll just work on those people that like the way my stuff looks. Not to say that I won’t keep in contact with those people that don’t think they like the way my stuff looks right now, because that’s one thing about… big part of my process is follow up. Even if those people sit on the back burner for six months and you just ping them every six months with an email or a phone call or a coffee, they always know that you’re out there and that you’re available and that you’re willing to help them to be successful in their business too.

There’s usually some sort of differentiator. Even the low price guys, typically will have a marketing department that has some sort of information on what differentiates your products from your competitors. That’s what I look for.

 

Kip:

It certainly makes a lot of sense to me where you may not know what that differentiator is upfront, or there may be some go-to once you try out. But it sounds like when you’re really with that builder or that homeowner, whoever’s the potential customer, then based on what they’re trying to do, then you can find a differentiator that you can latch onto, or really build that relationship. And that I guess, sales pipeline for that. Is that fair?

 

Dale Kruse:

That’s exactly it. People talk about finding pain points or whatever, I like to find positive points. I’ll go and ask, “Hey, what are those guys doing good for you? How did you make the decision to use their products?” That’s one of my favorite go-to as far as… If I meet somebody in the grocery store, for example, and they’re a builder that I’ve never done business with, and I find out they’re using my competitor’s product, I ask them why? I mean, why not ask why. You don’t have anything to lose, they’re not buying your stuff anyway. If they think you’re the biggest jerk in the world, they’re still not going to buy your stuff. So why not ask why. If we have a rapport going, they’ll give an answer and it’ll be an honest answer typically I’ve found.

Maybe your product doesn’t fit into whatever they’re doing. And if that’s the case, wish them well and tell them that if there’s anything you can help with, let you know. I mean, there’s lots of things to sell. There’s lots of spots to fit in. And there’s just times when my product won’t work for what that particular project is, or that particular builder wants to happen, or whatever. And I’m okay walking away from that. I’m not going to try and fit my product into an application where it’s going to have… where it doesn’t fit. If it doesn’t fit right and that builder doesn’t want to change to make it fit right then it’s okay. There’ll be something else down the road that I can sell them.

 

Graham:

Right. What does make Fiber Cement such a great material for homeowners in terms of remodeling or building over other solutions?

 

Dale Kruse:

I am glad you asked. At least in my market, the main thing that we’ve seen is Fiber Cement doesn’t rot. Especially along the high five corridor and I’m talking Pacific Northwest, there’s a lot of wood siding that has been put on the wall the last, I don’t know, 30 years or so. Because of problems with natural wood products that eventually they’ll rot, they crack, they curl. There’s lots of things why you would want to switch to a product like Fiber Cement. Fiber Cement doesn’t move. Think about your sidewalk. If your sidewalk moved around or expand and contract, when I say move around, that’s what I mean, expand and contract as much as something else that you would put on the sidewalk.

Cement, doesn’t move if it moves, it breaks. Yeah, the framing behind, the siding will move and shift and grow and things like that. But the Fiber Cement itself doesn’t move. So what happens is the finishes that you put on them, paint, typically our products are all painted. The paint that goes on your Fiber Cement will last longer because it doesn’t move. Now, it might fade from UV, but it won’t peel like it does on wood.

Your maintenance cycle is reduced along with your maintenance costs. If you have wood siding, for example, you might need to wood siding and trim, that’s where we see the most opportunities in the trim Area. You won’t have to paint that trim as often, because I don’t know if you’ve ever looked at a building that’s been around for 10 years or so, and the paint’s peeling off the trim, that’s probably wood. That’s not an issue with Fiber Cement.

The other thing in the West, especially, and this is all over the West is fire resistance. There are a boatload of wildland-urban interface areas, or buoy is what we call them out here, buoy areas. That you just can’t have flammable products on the outside of your building. Fiber Cement doesn’t burn. It’s kind of a shield in there.

 

Kip:

Well, that’s a certainly interesting. So you mentioned that it doesn’t rot, it doesn’t move and the fire resistance is what you do. And I assume it lasts longer than what competitors do?

 

Dale Kruse:

Yeah. I mean, there’s a million houses probably out here with Cedar on them. And even now you can get good tight grain clear Cedar products, but they’re expensive, far more expensive. So I guess that’s another advantage of Fiber Cement over wood. Typically, they’re far more expensive than a Fiber Cement product. So it’s one of those things where I’m not going to say that it’s going to last longer than wood, because I’m sure if I do say something like that, then people stomp on the podcast saying, “Oh my gosh, that guy’s crazy.”

 

Kip:

They’re going to revolt.

 

Dale Kruse:

Yeah. Yeah. But it is a very long lasting product. Okay? I mean, you can look at the Coliseum in, what is it? In Greece and it’s concrete. So there you go.

 

Kip:

Good. Yeah. Well now thanks for being, I guess, honest about the differences with the wood there and it may not be… Certainly they may last the same length. I know we’re getting close to our hour here and wanted to certainly thank you for your time, Dale. I really enjoyed the conversation, especially with the team development, the management styles, how to look for differentiators in a product like yours. I’m sure there’s other companies out there and listeners that have similar challenges. I do want to give a shout out to your company and Allura, and if people wanted to reach out Dale, what’s the best way for them to get in touch?

 

Dale Kruse:

Yeah, people can call me or email me. My email is dkruse, kruse@elementalia.com. Yeah. I’m available pretty much all the time and especially people in the West, if I’m not the guy that is covering your area, I can get you connected with… actually across the country, I’ll get you connected with whoever you need to be connected with.

 

Graham:

All right, folks, that wraps us up for today’s show. So you can find our podcast on Apple Podcast, Spotify and SoundCloud by searching for the Concora Corner. And if you’d like to, we’d love a rating and a short review. If you listen on Apple, any feedback is appreciated on any of our shows that are coming out, or just the show in general, or if you just want to say hello. You can find out more about Concora and our services at www.concora.com. We’re on Facebook @facebook.com/concorallc. We were on Twitter @Concora, and you can find us on LinkedIn at linkedin.com/company/concora. Thanks for listening and have a great day.

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