PODCASTS

Building Marketplace Dominance Through Innovation and Understanding

Building Marketplace Dominance Through Innovation and Understanding

 

Kip and Graham talk to Joel Simpson of Forney, L.P. about overcoming starting an executive role right before the pandemic and how the company’s automated tool Forneyvault is blazing a new trail for the Construction Materials Testing industry.


 

Podcast Participants:

Graham: Product Director Concora
Kip Rapp: CEO Concora
Joel Simpson: Vice President of Sales and Marketing at Forney

 

Graham:
Hello, everyone. Welcome to The Concora Corner, a podcast dedicated to bringing you interviews with folks working in the AEC and BPM industry. I’m one of your hosts, Graham Waldrop, a Director of Product here at Concora. Today on the show we’re talking with Joel Simpson, who is the Vice President of Sales and Marketing at Forney LP. Joel takes us through how he started at Forney right before the COVID-19 pandemic, and all the challenges that brought to his new role as an executive. He also discusses how Forney Vault is the trailblazer for CMT applications through its ability to automate data throughout the entire testing process, expediting the time it takes to test, and minimizing the risk of errors occurring when processing CMT data. We hope you enjoy today’s interview with Joel, but before we begin, here’s a quick word from our CEO, Kip Rapp.

 

Kip:
I wanted to thank everyone again for listening to our podcast. If you’re interested in knowing more about Concora, we help building product manufacturers get specified and purchase more by providing a great lab experience that’s bolted onto your website. It makes it easy for your architects, engineers and contractors to do business online with you. We sum it up as three things, it’s providing a good web experience, good content and good tools. We have some great tools such as submittals, sustainability, project showcases, or anything else needed by your design community to specify purchase products. We’d be more than happy to show you a quick demo, you can go to concora.com to learn more, read case studies and see how other customers have grown sales with our partnership.

 

Graham:
Thanks, Joel, for participating in our podcast. I know when we talked last time there was a really good story around your company, launching in COVID or definitely a trying time, and I’m sure our listeners would enjoy that. I’ve talked to a lot of people that are managing through COVID, some good, some bad, and it’s definitely some good lessons learned in how people are doing business differently today. I’d like to start out by who you are and what you do, what your company does, and what makes them different.

 

Joel Simpson:
I’m the Senior Vice President Sales Marketing with Forney. Forney is actually 105 years old, I did the math on that really quick. I knew we were over 100, but 1916 the company was originally started as a machine shop, which I think is a way a lot of companies in this industry start. We manufacture construction material testing equipment, so things that test materials for things like infrastructure, bridges, roads, and buildings. But more recently, and really the reason I came on board was we’ve launched a new product, really a whole new avenue of construction material testing software. It’s a software platform that really is focused on the internet of things. So, it’s not just a cloud based database, but it’s connecting to the machine. So, we’ve integrated the testing machines into this hole, this gap that still existed in construction material testing processes. The shorthand way that we usually describe it is we’re able to get rid of the clipboard and increase accuracy, transparency and productivity of our testing labs for engineers, contractors, asset owners. That’s kind of the 50,000-foot level view of what we do.

 

Graham:
Yeah. No, that was interesting when we talked earlier because as you mentioned, you’re getting rid of the clipboard and you’re making it more efficient and automated for people to test and I would assume higher quality, and then hence the software that you mentioned that why you came on board. Was that something, Joel, that they brought you in specifically for this type of launch or did it come after?

 

Joel Simpson:
No. They had a fairly intensive search and they were searching for quite some time to find somebody who, one of the commands, it’s an interesting pivot for the company in that there’s kind of this existing company that all of a sudden is pivoting pretty dramatically over to a software product. So, the current sales team that was there, really sales process marketing the whole strategy that was in place was focused on CapEx equipment and supplies associated with it. Now, all of a sudden, you’re trying to sell a software solution because we’re a monthly or annual subscription. So, the folks that had concrete and material in their veins weren’t really the right team in place to be all of a sudden selling a soft subscription model.

 

Graham:
Yeah. Now that’s cool. Definitely a very traditional challenge of going from software to, or going from services to software, and you’re not maybe told appropriately either from a process or talents or other things, right? What kind of spawned that? I assume the leadership team was, “Hey. Maybe we can do things differently by going into software versus services.” Is that why they were then looking? Or was there another way that that happened?

 

Joel Simpson:
Yeah. As maybe you can imagine, I’m sure a lot of the folks that you deal with, very engineering focused. So, it’s primarily in engineering companies, building machines, building processes that test construction materials, to building codes. So, there’s a lot of compliance issues that go along with that, and exactly how a test has to get conducted. So, through that, they were getting, I guess, incremental inquiries from customers about getting the test results to flow into LIMS systems or QA/QC systems. It was kind of an evolutionary moment that they realized we can build a better solution for that, because we have the machines, we ought to be able to build this software platform. So, it really started almost four years ago, four and a half years ago, as kind of an evolutionary processor development. Then really two years ago is when it gets super serious, and they took a hard pivot into, we’re going to build this. The product launched in Beta, with a handful of customers who were already interested. They said, “Fill the dreams kind of thing. You build it, we’ll take it.” In late fall of ’19, is when they officially launched commercially, and then I joined in January of ’20.

 

Graham:
They were already executing on this type of software solution?

 

Joel Simpson:
Yeah. What they had planned was, they had a third party create a website, and they had planned to really expand the number of trade shows that they were going to do, so that was the strategy for ’20. Because, as I mentioned, they were searching for somebody to really come and develop and drive sales and marketing strategy, but hadn’t found anybody. They’d been searching for a bit. Really a common denominator, a friend who actually is a sales trainer that I’ve worked with for about 20 years, almost 20 years. Well, didn’t need to say that out loud, that makes me feel old. Worked with a guy named John for like 20 years, and he connected the dots and put me together with the CEO of President.

 

Graham:
Oh, awesome. Well, good stuff. Were they struggling then with the, where they try to do with current leadership and then they realized at one point, hey, we need someone that has a little more of a background here?

 

Joel Simpson:
I think what it was is they recognized early on that they wanted somebody to come in specialized and help to make that transition, but they hadn’t found anybody they felt comfortable with. They had interviewed, I think 8, 9 people or so, I’m not exactly sure. But they had to kind of an ongoing recruiting effort and just hadn’t found anybody.

 

Graham:
You didn’t know the CEO directly of this company was through this colleague of yours that you knew 20 years?

 

Joel Simpson:
Yeah. I came from a much different industry actually, so construction was all new to me. In fact, my first day they were explaining to me the difference between concrete and cement. I came from the packaging world; I’ve been in packaging for quite some time. Packaging materials, I was super familiar with, but construction material is all different to me.

 

Graham:
Okay. So, obviously you accepted, and then COVID happens, and they launched right around when COVID started. I think COVID was like November, December in other countries, and it came to the U.S. somewhere around January, February. So, walk us through that, because that certainly, you started a company outside of your normal industry, or started with this new company, and now there’s this unforeseen thing that you were living-

 

Joel Simpson:
Yeah. I mean, in January, getting familiar, learning people’s names. I think that’s if I’m recalling kind of correctly, that’s when we were starting to hear, I forget when the first case was, but I think it was towards the end of January. So, we were kind of hearing news report what was going on in Wuhan, and then as it started to spread. But really wasn’t paying much attention to be honest with you, because I had traveled pretty extensively through Asia for my packaging gig for a lot of years, so I was there through SARS. So, I kind of assumed, incorrectly in retrospect, that it will get contained and everything would be just fine. I didn’t pay much attention; in fact, we were traveling. I think I did a trade show at the beginning of February, I think kind of mid-February, and it was the following Monday that Pennsylvania went on lockdown. I forget that exact date, but that’s roughly right, because I know it’s like a year now that I haven’t been on a plane, which is insane to me. I can’t remember never not being on plane. Then the decision was, well, this is all weird. What’s going on? But surely this will be over soon enough. We were kind of holding our breath and trade shows weren’t canceling yet. The immediate ones we’re postponing at that point, but not canceling. The idea of going-

 

Graham:
Sorry to interrupt. What was your general market strategy, go-to market strategy then? Was it go to some trade shows?

 

Joel Simpson:
Yeah. We had already registered for a number of shows, a total of 16, either large shows or small shows, things like warm up concrete and whatnot. That calendar was laid out for the year, and that’s the strategy that was in place, awareness campaign based on, let’s put a website up and let’s go out and do these trade shows. So, we were still in place, that was still in place until February and March as they started canceling and evolving. Then at some point you just realize this is not going to change fast, we’ve got to do something dramatically different. That’s when the focus pivoted hard to a content strategy, let’s take another look at the website and how that’s going to reach out to customer lead in our funnel.

 

Graham:
Prior to that there was trade shows, there was a website launch, there was some digital marketing, I would assume, was there anything else that was like a key marketing activity to launch your product?

 

Joel Simpson:
As I walked in the door that was the strategy, and digital advertising was a small, tiny component, and not much other content strategy. They had posted one blog on their website at that point. So, my plan was to dramatically expand the online presence, social, what we were doing with digital advertising, expand the content strategy moving to video. But I had kind of mapped that out throughout the course of the year and quickly realized that ball got to claw back fast now. So, we were.

 

Graham:
You have to accelerate that?

 

Joel Simpson:
Yeah. Dramatically accelerate it. Part of that plan was we had, so there’s really two websites, we have, I guess two assets. One for the main line business which is our construction material, the testing machine, and then Forney Vault has its own, and quickly realized well, our folks aren’t going to be face-to-face on machines any more either. So, now I was really concentrating not just on Forney Vault, but how do we do that it for our main line business as well. We ended up relaunching both sites and refocusing on an e-commerce site and the changes.

 

Graham:
So, you were responsible for both sides of the business, the software and the main line?

 

Joel Simpson:
Yes. The way this integrates is that the software platform works on top of these machines, that’s the internet of things way. But that businesses, you can imagine at 100 years old, very stable. People have cut back in place of these testing machines. They’re planning sometimes 12 months out for these purchases. So, that’s a very stable business and didn’t need a lot of attention. When I was coming in the plan was to concentrate on Forney Vault, but we had a direct sales team whose focus was on travel and face-to-face meeting, and all of a sudden that all evaporated. We quickly stopped travel, as everybody did, and that was moving to online. So, we now had to change how we were getting our information out about machines in addition to the software platform.

 

Graham:
Take us through Forney Vault a little bit, seems like it’s a great tool for being able to sort of give an unbiased perspective on testing construction materials. I’m curious about how that works. I come from the product side at Concora, so I’m always interested when people have a great product, what it actually does, and sort of getting into the nitty gritty of how it helps people.

 

Joel Simpson:
The way I often describe it is that we fill this hole, this gap in the construction material testing process. The way that normally is, something like a building, a road, a bridge, somebody is going out and taking samples of let’s say the concrete that’s going to be utilized in whatever the infrastructure project is, pretend it’s a bridge. So, they’re taking samples and bringing that back into a lab to be cured. Those are tested based on a building code and ASTM standards over 7 working days, 28 days until the concrete is approved that it hit the required strength, whatever the design strength is for intended use. But all of that process is manual, and then it comes back and very often those are tested on machines. They have a digital readout and somebody’s scratching down strength results or test results by hand on a clipboard.

 

Joel Simpson:
Then those are walked over, and that’s where often they’re then hand entered into ideally some kind of a QA/QC system or Laboratory Information Management System. But just as often as just going into Excel, or some kind of a homemade database type of product, that means you can get errors from things like transposition of numbers, to just scratching it down line, entering it wrong, testing the wrong specimen on the wrong date. So, you can get erroneous data pretty easily. What Forney Vault does is starting with the, we say we make the machines smart and that we’ve got bartered applications, that as the samples or specimens are pulled into the curing room they’re labeled and identified with a GEOID code so that now that that individual specimen is resident in the cloud database. We already know that it exists.

 

Joel Simpson:
On the appropriate date it’s toggling the technician, the lab manager to test those individual specimens, and then that data is automatically transitioned from a data acquisition device on the machine right into the database, which is ball, I call database. Well, I was going to say then we have our own user interface called Forney Tools, where they can manage those test results in the specimens and we’ve got an open API that we can then feed those results into things like various LIMS systems, QA/QC system, sometimes with an ERP system that is home grown within the customers so that they can manage their invoicing. Today, we’re working on integrations with BIM systems as well.

 

Graham:
That’s great. It sounds like once you scan that GEOID, then it becomes practically an automated experience at that point.

 

Joel Simpson:
Yeah. Pretty significant automation. We’ve shown productivity studies for instance, where for a large scale labs people testing a lot, we can save significant time and allow that person to, instead of managing a test machine or just managing data, and really able to concentrate on activities in the lab that matter, as opposed to just managing that process of scanning, watching a concrete cylinder brake, and then hand writing results onto a clipboard, and then doing really clerical work. All of that really gets to go away.

 

Graham:
Do your competitors have a similar tool? Are you guys kind of blazing the trail here?

 

Joel Simpson:
Blazing the trail at the moment, and we’re far enough along in development that we don’t see anybody in the shadows at the moment, so that’s the exciting part. It’s pretty innovative. I’m sure you guys probably see it as well, construction in general isn’t known for its digitization I guess is the right word to say. We’re probably all familiar with some McKinsey reports that come up, they’ve put it just above agriculture as far as the pivot to an online world. That’s changing dramatically now. I think that’s as a result of COVID. We see a lot of people looking for different, more automated solutions. So, I was going to say it’s an exciting time, but that’s kind of a warped way of thinking about it. But COVID certainly has been a motivation for people to move ahead with processes they’ve been thinking about.

 

Graham:
Yeah. We’ve seen that a lot since the advent of COVID, with our company too in terms of people looking for more digital solutions and more automated solutions as opposed to, also just eliminating face-to-face contact as well, and being able to do business more effectively online which it sounds like Forney Vault also done.

 

Joel Simpson:
Yeah. I think it’s pretty interesting too, and that we were all, I was weaned on face-to-face interactions, and that’s how we learned, that’s how I sold. In fact, I just read an interesting, one of those articles popped up on LinkedIn, that 80% of our customers, B2B customers aren’t interested in seeing people, and they don’t imagine that changing.

 

Graham:
They hate people. They don’t talk to me anywhere, they just text me, TikTok me.

 

Joel Simpson:
Yeah. Interestingly, I’m seeing a heavy return to phone. I think because so many people pivoted to email so much last year that we all got overwhelmed with emailing probably. So, we’re seeing some better responses from old style cold calling, which is being pretty effective.

 

Graham:
Yeah. I mean, I know people they’re at home, right? They’re less distracted, may be right, because of the flyby office visits. So, we’ve seen that too as just a propensity to take meetings, and that’s interesting. Definitely heard, talk to other people who were, COVID. It’s an unfortunate event, and it’s really opening and accelerating more of these digital type of practices. Yeah, with the internet being faster and millennials, right, where you have a lot of digital interactions, and technology. It’s kind of moved us forward to more of these consumption by demand and digital type of demand. We’ve seen that with even talking to some manufacturer when they talk to architects, they’re like, “Yeah, architects. Gosh, they’re just busy. They want to work on a more flexible clock, and they want to reach out to you at their time and moment.” So, there’s a lot of digital practices going on there. It was cool, you mentioned earlier you were launching, you had to pivot heavily into digital, from a web and content strategy. Can you kind of take us back to that and what you did to pivot? What worked well and what didn’t? Then now you’re here today, and assumingly there’s some good things going on, right?

 

Joel Simpson:
Yeah. I mean, the concentration where I really want to was to concentrate more on, I guess organic SEO, which for me that’s really all about content. We dug in heavy on case studies, accelerated blog posts, added in video into that mix. Then really started to concentrate a lot on outreach to trade magazines, but not for advertising, but for the potential to do knowledge articles. We have seven articles that we’ve published as authors for, really not articles about publicizing Forney necessarily, but just authoritative articles about what’s happening. In the beginning we did a couple of COVID articles and as it evolved over to digitization and automation, and how work processes can be improved. In fact, we just got our second unsolicited request from a magazine to write another article. So, that’ll be our second article for one magazine, the third for the other.

 

Joel Simpson:
So, that strategy has worked well, once I’m able to repost that and link to a couple of different places that’s helped me build some authority on the site. But my funnel is really all based on leading people into the site to try to get to concentrate on conversions there, and then leading that down through the sales funnel. Then some with people we know, because we’re super lucky in that we’re not a software platform that’s starting from scratch, nobody’s ever heard of us. Forney has a great name within the niche of construction material testing, so there’s a lot to leverage off of there. So, in cold calling, we’re not exactly cold calling out, we’re able to say we’re warm calling because people know the name on my call.

 

Graham:
As you made these, it seems fairly logical and normal type of digital marketing efforts, like everything you mentioned from the SEO and more content. How did you measure results? I know there’s all these different measures, some are short term and long term, but what have you seen as far as early success and later success?

 

Joel Simpson:
Yeah. Well, as you described them, everything that we’re doing is old style blocking and tackling. I haven’t done anything particularly unique. Just trying to do more of it faster, and then the result of that is exactly as you described, how do you measure all that? What’s being successful? The tool that we use for that is really in the implementation of HubSpot. So. all of our data flows back into HubSpot. There we’ve been able to build out some, a better word is aggregate our analytics to determine what are conversions that are coming in? How is that starting on the site? What is first six look like? Where are people coming from? Is paid working versus organic? Then that correlates with, because HubSpot is pretty interesting in that it’s really focused on sales behaviors. So, there’re easy correlations with some data analytics. They’re telling me that are phone calls working better than email outreaches? Are LinkedIn in mails working better than traditional emails? So, that’s how we’re kind of aggregating the activities and figuring out what’s working.

 

Graham:
Are you using HubSpot for the CRM too?

 

Joel Simpson:
Yeah. We’re now using HubSpot for CRM. We’re using their sales hub tool, have implemented their service but tool. We originally were going to go with a different that I think most people are familiar with, but getting everything under one roof was just easy to go. The service hub worked out pretty great for us for ticketing support tickets. That integrates easily with Out-of-the-box, they have a knowledge base tool, it’s been great for us to start to publicize our internal FAQs, and help articles and onboarding help for customers since we’re not able to visit them.

 

Graham:
Yeah. HubSpot’s definitely, I impressed with it. It’s easy to use and modern, I guess compared to some others. So, that’s why they’re doing well, because you can tell they focus on the user experience and practicality of what you’re trying to do.

 

Joel Simpson:
I think you and I chatted briefly on my experience with Salesforce. I was a Salesforce user, and I would still say as a Salesforce proponent, I mean, the level of customization that we had with Salesforce was tremendous. We were almost utilizing it as our ERP. We just didn’t do invoicing, but we were managing our purchasing bills, incoming bills, we were doing everything in Salesforce. But the level of, I mean, in order to do that we had a Salesforce admin on staff. We did that and our annual was, let’s just say 14 times what I’m spending on HubSpot annually. And out of the box, I was using HubSpot within under a month. It’s a lot more point and click, and for an organization where I’m the marketing department using some outsourced contractors, that’s super important. I’ve been pretty impressed with the product.

 

Graham:
As you mentioned, you represent marketing and you’re using an agency or some contractors to help you out with all the things that you were just talking about. It appears they’re definitely great results, so can you kind of walk us through the results side of, I’m sure your boss and your peers are saying, “Oh, this stuff’s working. We’re getting more awareness and top the funnel, we’re converting these.” I’m sure the sales people are saying, “Oh, yeah, that was a nice lead, right?” Can you walk us through some of that?

 

Joel Simpson:
Yeah. I mean, we’re certainly seeing that on the ForneyVault side, but probably very tangible results that are interesting because there’s so much history on the machine side on our Forney online website. Not traditional strategy, as I said. It’s always been very focused on sales reps in the field, so we just relaunched that site in November of last year with a heavy focus back to the funnel and conversions. We’re seeing now paid results that are convert, paid advertising has resulted to an actual, converted to an order is actually in the teens as a conversion rate, which I’d be thrilled with this if these were small dollar but these machines cost anywhere from $12,000 to $20,000. So, that’s a fairly significant opportunity for you us to apply some more dollars to paid and the ROI makes a lot of sense.

 

Joel Simpson:
But on the organic side, just getting people from our keyword strategy has been really tremendous. I mean, what we’re seeing inbound leads now, they’re in the teens a week. For, again, a CapEx equipment that is pretty significant, as opposed to in the past. That meant we had to send people on a plane out to visit, rent a car, drive for two states, three states. So, the efficiencies are pretty dramatic. Because we’ve got the comparison of what we were doing, to what we are doing. Pretty interesting comparison.

 

Graham:
Now, that’s great. So, from the traditional company side, doing that more of a digital approach, obviously COVID, and it sounds like worked well, versus the normal analog approach of people in the field. I’m sure there’s a mix of that maybe in the future. But that seems great. Then on the software side, is that the similar experience? I am discussing, it’s like a new kind of way of doing business with the company that you know, and it relates to software. So, there’s some level education of what you’re doing to get people to want to talk to you. I don’t know if other people are already doing testing software automation or something, if they’re typing that in already, or if you have to educate the market?

 

Joel Simpson:
Yeah. There are different strategies. I mean, clearly we all want to sell something, but the software side, everything from the content strategy to the site, we actually just relaunched, that’s in January this year. It’s pretty significantly focused on education and awareness. It’s easy to describe our machines because they were invented in 1950, so they’ve been around for a long time and people know what they are, they have them in their labs. But to try to describe the value of our software solution versus somebody else’s, what differentiates us is pretty, that’s a different level of conversation. So, you have to lay it out differently. The journey of how that user executes your site is pretty important. The original site as we launched it, and that was going back to fall of ’19, really was just a number of pages that we discussed the capabilities and highlights of what the software did. But it really wasn’t a progression of here, let’s give you a 50,000-foot view, drill down to 40 on the next stage, 30, and progressively along the journey to, now click begin for more information and we’ll give you a call.

 

Joel Simpson:
So, there’s a lot more of a thought process about how our customer would learn what we are and become potentially increasingly interested, and that’s where also then a remarketing strategy works pretty significantly, because if you do happen to bail on me on page two, then I’m going to keep painting that gap to remind you to come back.

 

Graham:
What worked out well? I mean, you think back in the 12 months and what worked out really well? And then what would you do over again if you had to?

 

Joel Simpson:
I would probably have relaunched the site’s earlier, particularly the main line business. That probably would have taken an extra 40 hours a week worth of work to have accomplish earlier, but the results from that have been dramatic enough that it would have been nice to have that under my belt earlier. I guess I say that because at least I have this vision, I think lots of us seeing to that, once we’re through, testing is behind us. Now as a challenge, the vaccination rates are now or next thing. So, we all have this vision of July as I’m going to be, that’s our pivot point where maybe things start to get back to normal, July, August, September. So, the more I have done, the more I’m ahead of the game. I mean, that’s probably what I would have tried to have done, was maybe accelerate things. For sure though, the things that worked well, currently we’re working on more video, just the consumption of video is just unbelievable to me versus traditional, like an eight-page case study. That’s traditionally been super important to customers. That’s the validation for, here’s our list customer user and here’s how they were successful. I think now they want to see that in a 90 second video. That’s a significant shift in where we’re headed right now.

 

Graham:
Yeah. I’ll find someone else, they’re saying video has about twice as much more chance of being watched and engaged with than just normal text, and they were comparing it to 7% versus 14%. I mean, it makes sense because, gosh, you’d like to hear it and understand what someone’s saying. It’s easier to consume sometimes if you’re exercising or doing something, right? You just don’t, or you’re in a car. It appears that everyone’s fairly taking moments of their day to do things and learn things, and then they want to be able to do it on their own time. I guess, with all that put together, definitely, people are visual learners, right? So, that’s awesome, too. That’s a nice example.

 

Graham:
I really appreciate your story because a lot of good touch points with what other people are struggling with or are doing with marketing in general, and product launches as you mentioned, and that kind of COVID challenge, and then the pivot to accelerate and take the best that you have. Then you had that kind of also the mainline website and the traditional equipment product that you had to be able to help move through that transformation. You seem really well versed across these different channels and doing it kind of in a almost a bootstrap kind of way, right? Where you have contractors helping you out. That’s good stuff. I think we’re coming close to the end of our session. I would ask, though, I mean, what’s next for you? Now that you’ve, as you mentioned, July, there’s probably some vaccines, I don’t know if we’ll ever get back to normal this year. But what’s in your plans as far as what the company and how to accelerate your growth?

 

Joel Simpson:
We’re really preparing now for our next product extension, probably a better way to say it, for an enterprise subscription, that will really allow this testing data that exists to be leveraged by the asset owner. So, a level above, not the person who’s actually doing the testing, but the person who is, I guess, consuming the testing. So we’re in development of a product extension right now, and that’s really our next big push.

 

Graham:
So, that’d be the person that’s building the bridge, or the owner?

 

Joel Simpson:
Yeah. If you think about something infrastructure, it would be maybe the DOT who’s responsible for the bridge as the asset owner or, I’m from the New York, New Jersey areas so that might be the New York, New Jersey, the authority responsible for turnpikes in the airports and tunnels, those kinds of things.

 

Graham:
Kind of makes sense to me, because if you work with the DOT in that case, then you could work in all their projects moving forward, I would imagine, right? Then they can encourage their folks downstream to be able to follow this practice.

 

Joel Simpson:
Yeah. That’s exactly right. It’s kind of an enabling strategy. The asset owner, they’re, again, consuming this data. So, if they would need to then work with labs that are Forney Vault enabled, they’ve got the software in the lab is actually doing the testing. In order to utilize Forney Vault, you don’t have to have a Forney testing machine. We can work on competitor’s machines, but it’s nice to have a Forney machine as well. So, there’s a nice synergy that exists in this product extension.

 

Graham:
Well, excellent. I really appreciate your time, Joel, and your experience with the product lines and the level of marketing insights that you gave the listeners. Again, I do think there’s a lot of good educational pieces that you brought forth from the focus on content, to focus on education and awareness, driving people to your website, and really then taking kind of that top the funnel, that journey. Because it’s like where we are at Concora, it’s like we’re in this different category that’s not well established like HubSpot. When you say HubSpot, or Salesforce, it’s like, oh, I know what you do. I know how to buy you. In any case of your position, they may know who you are from a traditional sense, but then like, oh, how do you really get them to understand your new offering and how that’s beneficial? So, that’s definitely I think a good story that transcends to other people that are in your shoes.

 

Joel Simpson:
Thanks very much. Yeah.

 

Graham:
All right, folks. That wraps us up for today’s show. You can find our podcast on Apple Podcast, Spotify and SoundCloud by searching for The Concord Corner. If you’d like to, we’d love a rating and a short review if you listen on Apple. Any feedback is appreciated on any of our shows that are coming out, or just the show in general, or if you just want to say hello. You can find out more about Concora and our services at www.concora.com. We are on Facebook, at facebook.com/ConcoraLLC. We are on Twitter @Concora, and you can find us on LinkedIn, at LinkedIn.com/company/concora. Thanks for listening and have a great day.

 

 

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