PODCASTS

Best practices for building successful social media communities

Best practices for building successful social media communities

Kip sits down with Kevin Enke of Klein Tools to discuss digital marketing and more explicitly, marketing with Social Media and how to properly utilize it and the data that you need to know about when making your posts.



 

Podcast Participants:

Graham: Product Director Concora
Kip Rapp: CEO Concora
Kevin Enke: Digital Technology Manager Klen Tools

 

Graham:

Hey, everyone and welcome back to The Concora Corner, a podcast dedicated to bringing you interviews of folks working in the industry. I’m one of your hosts, Graham Waldrop, director of product here at Concora. Today we’re talking with Kevin Enke who’s the digital technology manager at Klein Tools. Kevin has over 30 years of experience in sales and marketing and talks with Kip today about his experience with marketing in today’s digital age. Kevin goes over the benefits and detriments of marketing use of social media platforms like Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and even TikTok, which as a millennial, I still don’t fully understand what TikTok does or what it’s about. So that was enlightening for me to hear about how you can market through TikTok. So if you’re looking to better understand not only how to market better on social media platforms and the data behind how your posts reach your followers, then I think you’re in for a real treat here with this upcoming interview with Kevin. So I’ll see you folks after the interview, but before we begin, here’s a quick word from our CEO, Kip Rapp.

 

Kip:

I wanted to thank everyone again for listening to our podcast and if you’re interested in knowing more about Concora, we help building product manufacturers get specified and purchase more by providing a great web experience that’s bolted onto your website. It makes it easy for your architects, engineers and contractors to do business online with you. We sum it up as three things, it’s providing a good web experience, good content and good tools. And we have some great tools such as submittals sustainability, project showcases or anything else needed by our design community to specify and purchase products. We’d be more than happy to show you a quick demo and you can go to concora.com to learn more, read case studies and see how other customers have grown sales with our partnership.

Good stuff. Yeah. Now, thanks Kevin for joining our podcast. Again, I was really excited to talk to you today and your involvement in more of the social media aspects of what your company does and how that can build awareness and growth and sales. So I’m sure our listeners will enjoy that quite a bit. Did want to open it up and just introduce yourself Kevin and what you do, your company, what your company does, what makes them different?

 

Kevin Enke:

Yeah, Kip thanks for having me on today. My name’s Kevin Enke, I work as a digital technology manager for Klein Tools. Klein’s been a staple in the construction and electrical trades for over 160 years, family run company. We have a lot of subsidiaries. So my role, I’ve been in various sales, marketing and now, I’m a hybrid IT support role to make sure we maximize digital technologies. So I’ve had a lot of experience over the last decade with managing, building websites, strategy, growing social media and building communities within the construction space.

 

Kip:

Awesome. Yeah. And this community, I don’t hear as much talking to other sales and marketing leaders, Kevin. And so maybe you can walk us through how you got involved and how you discovered the importance of communities and social media, and I know there’s a lot of… When people say social media, it’s quite diverse. It means a lot of things and there’s like LinkedIn and Facebook and TikTok and Pinterest. And we have listeners that are in marketing, either leaders or coordinators and some of them I run into, they don’t do a lot of social media and because everyone has their own limits and resources and skillsets. So how did you guys get into that and figure out that this was important for what you’re doing?

 

Kevin Enke:

Yeah, it’s interesting because, certainly social media, as you said, takes many forms. I remember back in the nineties, talking in the construction space that people were asking, “Will websites be relevant?” And now they’re driving a lot of dollars and views from customers. So certainly, what I love about working at Klein Tools is, you look at the logo and at the center of it is a lineman who’s climbing the telephone poles and keeping our power on, especially important lately. Now, so we’re appreciative of our customers and that’s something that I’ve always had a passion for through my career, is being customer centric and a lot of companies you get customer feedback and that’s how you create innovation, is being tapped into your customers and more and more they want a relationship and there’s a lot to be learned.

So social media isn’t just a one-way conversation, that’s where I talk about it more as a community and it can range… It’s not just your typical sites, like Facebook has a large audience and Pinterest has its own space depending on what you’re doing and what you’re targeting, but also forums and communities and a lot of… Actually, what happens in community management on our side, are the conversations that don’t happen in public. It’s a lot of the conversations and engagement that happens, not only off a post, but in the direct messaging that you tend to build with your community. And the goal there is really to get those groups of supporters and advocates to help support your case and take it out on the job site on a daily basis. So, that’s something we’ve enjoyed doing.

 

Kip:

That’s very cool. So, I mean, I’m not anywhere well-versed in this community type of philosophy that you’re saying and it definitely sounds intuitive where you’re saying that it’s really how you engage with your community and it’s not just a one-way conversation, it’s not just LinkedIn, but, assumingly, it’s any type of place where you can interact and have genuine relationships. And it sounds like from there you’re building advocates and trust, and it is assuming, I guess, having kind of that genuine relationship that is timely and honest and respectful, is that seem right for what you mean by community?

 

Kevin Enke:

Yeah, absolutely. I mean, trust in a brand is a cornerstone, right? And so that’s the extension of what you’re doing in social media. And certainly, you have to listen, you have to cultivate what your audience is, who you’re targeting and the channels come into play too, right. So as an example, LinkedIn is more of a professional targeted in the construction market toward larger construction firms, for instance in about company culture and things like that versus Facebook’s more of a general conversation with the construction audience and Instagram is really become popular with the construction workers because it’s so simple, right? It’s less ads out there, very simple, snap a picture, easy to search with the hashtags and we’ve seen TikTok kind of grow.

So basically, you have to understand what platform are your customers on and what kind of conversations do they want to have. YouTube’s been big for a long time and it’s the second largest search engine after Google itself. A lot of people get information and it’s great for long-form videos and people. Our audience does tutorials and reviews and then works great for their audience and to get the word out for us as well when we try and support that group, but coming into… Basically, Twitter started it with short videos, but now Instagram picked up and TikTok’s now kind of made that 15 second to or kind of demonstration more and more popular these days.

 

Kip:

Is most of your audience… You mentioned construction workers, is that the large majority or are there other people that you’re trying to build communities with?

 

Kevin Enke:

Yeah. It’s mainly the target. Like I said, depending on the platform, of course, we’re in the process of starting new dedicated sites for our culture and careers area. And so that’s targeting really people who want to see what it’s like at Klein. We do that careers part on LinkedIn, but places like Facebook, YouTube, that’s all contractor focused. So really knowing your audience,

 

it’s not typically… Not that do-it-yourselfers don’t use our tools, but with all the tool companies I’ve worked with, you focus on the pros and then a lot of cases, if you talk about a DIY topic, the pros do it for a living don’t necessarily feel that you’re talking to them. So it’s very important to be on target and the contractors is really the focus of what we talk to and put content out for.

 

Kip:

Sure. I was talking to someone else, Kevin, the other day who mentioned that people care about not only… I guess in your case these construction workers about the tools that you have and why yours is better, but they also care about what Klein stands for, what their cultural definition, what their sustainable definition is. Do you see that as important in your communities to promote that? Is there a connection between that and making better relationships with your customers?

 

Kevin Enke:

Yeah, absolutely. I think it’s not unique to us, but it’s also something that we take great pride in. Our management’s really made a point to share what Klein is about. And like I said, that’s why we’re putting up the career’s exclusive site and on our pages, we share different events and activities we do. Certainly, we don’t talk about all the charitable stuff we do, but people get a sense of what we’re supporting and how we’re promoting the certain core values that we have. Certainly, a lot of people are interested in the fact that we are a US-based company. A lot of US manufacturing people have… We’re actually working with other groups. So like right now, there’s a Klein Tools collectors group on Facebook that we’re helping to support. But they go back and have as old as 1908, 1906.

So it’s pretty cool to see and support those guys, and looking back at the history and what Klein Tools has meant to the trade and electricians and linemen and. So, that’s all part of, like you said, it’s building that relationship. A lot of the posts that we put up come from our audience. I believe in user-generated content, so let them tell the story. We could talk about product features and benefits, but more interested in how our customers use things. But like you said, company culture is a big part and you continue to see posts on that so that you can peel back and look at what actually life is like within our company.

 

Kip:

Sure. And let’s say a lot of our listeners Kevin, let’s say they’re marketing and they’re a traditional marketer or digital marketer and they have some awareness of social media and they want to adopt more of this community approach that you’re suggesting, and a lot of our customers too, Kevin, are looking at commercials, sales or residential sales or selling to contractors. So is there anything that you can give advice on, on how they could start? What’s important? I know it’s quite diverse, but any thoughts you can share on that?

 

Kevin Enke:

Yeah, absolutely. I think like a lot of things you can scale it as small as you want to start it and as big as you want to grow it. These days social media is one of those outlets like email and calling up a company used to be. It’s a great pipeline to get feedback from the customers. So if you have a website presence, it makes sense to have at least one or two of the channels out there from a social perspective. If you’re going to do it right, it’s really not a part-time effort. Daily, you have a dedicated person or if you want to work with an outside agency, either way the key, I think, to start it is to have a strategy, who’s your customer? What do you want to say to them? And basically, from there once you understand that, you get a platform, we use Falcon that IO, Sprout Social. There’s plenty that start out with free plans that you can grow into as you get bigger and do more things.

But I think the most important thing on all that is to take the time to listen. So whoever it is, your customers are going to tell you how they feel and so you should take the feedback and know what you’re going to do with that. Then ultimately, your customers want to hear from you. One of the more important things is to have a content calendar, review it with whoever manages the communications. And in our part, we share with a good part of the company so that everybody’s aware of what we’re posting and everybody can update their customers or feel comfortable with what we’re saying. Other industries that have more regulation… Of course, you have to have that part of the review too. But having a calendar means that you can basically understand and your customers can expect a regular stream of types of content.

 

Kip:

Yeah. With that I’m following along with, you have a web, you have published some channels on there and social channels, ideally have a dedicated person and then you mentioned, you need to take the time to listen. So for listeners, I mean, what are you listening for? Is it for what customers want to hear about Klein? Is it about their problems? Is about what they’re trying to do? But what are you listening for?

 

Kevin Enke:

Yeah. Kip that’s a great question. I think there’s a few different things. First, I’m a big believer in the Tesla and optimize. So you’re not going to be an expert on what exactly works and sometimes you can’t go and wanting to create viral content, that doesn’t work that way, right. So basically, you have to try different types of content and see what your customers feel or think about it, you take the feedback. So it’s as simple as you can look at the comments. Ideally, as you get more into it, these platforms that I mentioned allow you to review some of the analytics. So it’s a little bit right-brain, left-brain. You want the creativity, you want to make sure you’re putting good imagery and content out there, but then you want to come back on the other side and measure it and make sure you could see what’s resonating with your customers, what performed better, but probably most importantly is type of content, like photos, did they like particular product posts or posts on what you did culture wise or special events or days.

 

And I think what’s important for management too as you’re talking about… And what’s great about our management is, they understand, they want the engagement and we’re also using the. Typically, in most companies if a well-run social media platform becomes your second largest driver for your website traffic behind search. So that’s very important to drive people to your website and then ultimately the goal is leading those people through what they want to see on your company or your product or service.

 

Kip:

What you’re listening for, it depends on what’s important based on that community, the company, the customers they have and maybe there’s some experimenting and at some point, as you mentioned, it could be visual content, it could be educational, it could be cultural. And once you have that, then you’re able to then analyze and look at the performance metrics of its engagement or traffic of some sort, and that can really help build it organically after that?

 

Kevin Enke:

Yeah. If you love continuous learning. I mean, that’s what I find most fascinating about social and community management. You’re never going to be necessarily set in a way that you’re not learning something on every post every day. So it’s really interesting to see how… And in each different platform, the audiences tend to react a little differently. So there’s plenty to learn there. And I think as you get down the road, like I said, a lot of people also listening, some people take to social media to talk about what their issues are if they can’t get through on the phone or email, a lot of people reach out through social media to try and get their questions answered. So it’s important to, I think, listen not only from a customer service standpoint, but also what type of information do they like to hear about and then, ultimately, you start growing that community aspect as you start building relationships. That’s the part that takes a little bit longer, is really to see who’s really going to give you feedback both good and bad that you can take back and learn from.

 

Kip:

Sure. And then besides your normal social media outlets for communities, you kind of alluded to some other things like forums and maybe there’s websites where, in your case, contractors congregate. Is that what you’re alluding to, that whoever these community are either sponsoring these communities or adding value to existing communities, you’re finding out or they may lie, anyways and it could be hard to find it, but is that part of what you were saying?

 

Kevin Enke:

So it’s beyond just, I’m going to start or have a Facebook page and I’m going to post twice a week. We tend to get involved, we have a loyalty club that has its own website. And you have to look holistically at these customers, there’s overlap and in some cases there isn’t, right. So somebody who may be on Twitter would never go on Instagram and vice versa. There’s also if you’re not established, there’s great groups especially on the Facebook side and that has taken a deep dive into your industry already or maybe even your brand. And so that’s where we tend to support people, either through re-posting their content or having conversations with them, giving them feedback on reviews or videos that they’ve done and then, of course, there’s forums. Necessarily, need to have your own, but a lot of the industry trades have good activity going on, electrician talks in our industry. That does a really good job and we tend to support them and try and understand what people are talking about outside of the Klein run entity to see what’s going on in the industry in general.

 

Kip:

So yeah, I know we went off a little bit on that with listening, what to produce, how to measure it and then you were mentioning in your kind of framework, the content calendar and making sure that that’s available for the company. So could you walk us through the other salient points of this? If someone’s trying to build out, maybe their social media community one-on-one framework.

 

Kevin Enke:

To start from the one-on-one standpoint, like I said, you go back to making sure that you know the voice of the company and if you have somebody that’s kind of focusing on social… I’ve seen plenty of times, you’ve got somebody who’s kind of getting started, maybe likes the excitement of social, but doesn’t necessarily capture the voice of the company. That’s out there sometimes. So that’s why I like, the more people in the company that see the content, the better. You get a lot of feedback, but it’s better to get it on the front-end than later on. So that’s why I really encourage and appreciate when management gets involved and gets excited and shares in feedback for what they want to say out there.

If you do it right on the one-on-one, the manager should want to get their message out and create what story they tell and what new products or services they have that people are interested to hear about. These social platforms are a great way to get that out there. Part of it, it’s a give and take. In our case, impressions are nice, but how people are engaging with the content is more important and it’s resonating with the group. So there’s a lot of metrics roughly above a hundred or 200 you can measure, but try and narrow it down to one or two key ones. In our case, it’s that and then driving people to our website. So those are two things that we measure and then report back to management on what we’re doing.

 

 

Kip:

Thanks Kevin. Yeah, we have a lot of folks that predominantly building materials and are made up of small businesses. And I think there’s like 13,000 or 14,000 small businesses that are under 50 million in the US and the biggest challenge I see with them is like, “Well, our brand is not well known,” right? And one would assume with any of these it’s, how do you get people to engage with you? So do you have any kind of like hacks or growth hacks that if you’re a smaller company… And I would assume one of the goals of the community and social media is to grow engagement and awareness your company. Any tips or things that the small business marketer can do to help improve that in less trial and error?

 

Kevin Enke:

What’s been great about the internet and then social media kind of as the next way behind that is, it’s the great equalizer. It kind of democratizes what’s out there. So very much it doesn’t depend on size, you can get your message out there. So what I would say is, get started, get posting, even if you don’t have your own platform get involved in the ones that run communities in your industry and start getting involved in the discussion. Ultimately, there’s a lot to… LinkedIn is a really good platform, I would say, for business. Certainly, you can get your word out there pretty quickly. Facebook and Instagram are really big platforms, even though you may have an audience of, let’s say, 10,000 people to get started. All your posts aren’t going to reach all your customers. Actually, Facebook or Instagram will show your post to about three or four percent of your followers to begin.

It expands your audience if people start engaging with it, then they’ll show it to more and more of your audience. Really, you’re focusing on creating engaging content and picking the platforms where you know you have people interested. I would say, a lot of people talk about influencers and we’re not talking about necessarily paid influencers and people who do this for a living and people who are living in a YouTube and TikTok house right now on pop culture. But you look at the people who are in your industry that have a little larger audience and you start to collaborate or work with them, that’s one of the growth hacks, I think, that can bring visibility to your brand. If you have people that you share a common audience with, do some collaborations and that’ll get you exposed to a larger audience.

 

Kip:

Yeah. So it seems like what you’re saying is, well, just get started, right. And I was talking to some other people with LinkedIn and there’s techniques about if you’re posting, engage with it, encourage engagement, like it, link out and it helps improve, I guess, the algorithms, like you mentioned with Facebook. I assume it’s the same there, right. Is where, if no one’s-

 

Kevin Enke:

It is. You start out with a larger audience Kip, but in any platform, the more engagement you get, the wider it’s going to go. Typically, all these platforms, part of how they make money is advertising. You don’t necessarily need to start out advertising on these platforms, but it helps. In the case, what we tend to like to do is, when you get a certain organic push to start, you can tell people are interested in the topic, then you can come back around and have a little bit of a budget to boost those posts out a little bit. And what’s nice about all these platforms is, you can be very targeted about what audience you can send your message out to.

LinkedIn, very good. You could target particular trade groups that people belong to or other areas from a business perspective. Same thing, you can look at demographics for Facebook or Instagram. Have engaging content to start and then do a little bit of ad boosting, doesn’t need to be that expensive. You can spend 15, 20 dollars a day, for a couple of days. So it’s not like the days of buying a print ad in a magazine or a billboard, it’s reachable and it gives you a good stats on who’s engaging with your content there.

 

Kip:

Yeah. Now, that’s interesting because you were saying, you really want to listen to not only, what is the voice of the company you’re trying to convey to your community, but also what is important to the community. It’s a conversation, I would assume, across any of these channels and if it’s interesting, then they’ll engage. And I was looking at YouTube the other day and it’s interesting there because if you have interesting topics, then the algorithms will then recommend that to people that aren’t necessarily subscribed to your channel. So I assume it’s the same with these other social media channels. To then have organic conversations that are interesting to your current folks, like the construction workers in your case, but then it becomes a larger where then other construction workers will say, “Oh yeah, I was thinking about this too and it shows up in my Facebook feed or YouTube feed,” and then it grows. Is that how it generally works?

 

Kevin Enke:

Yeah. I mean artificial intelligence can work in a good way. Some people get creeped out about, why am I being recommended this? People complain about, if you’re talking to your home system like Google that they’ll follow you around, that’s not what we’re talking about. Basically, a lot of people keep it simple. Yeah. But all, Facebook and YouTube, they’re trying to find things that interest you, right. So they’re most interested in getting views. That’s their big portion. So anytime there’s good content out there that people are starting to like, that benefits them. And if it’s your content, of course that benefits you. So yeah, I mean, that’s all part of… I’d say the good side of artificial intelligence is that, it’s picking content that I like to see or want to see and exposing me to things that maybe I wouldn’t have searched on my own. I tend to embrace that and say, “okay!” What that means for a small business or a manufacturer is, make sure you’re putting out stuff that is interesting to people.

 

And then you don’t have to worry about necessarily the technology of it. But if you get a little deeper into make sure the right keywords or kind of phrases that people are searching or responding to are in your post. Like I said earlier, that’s where hashtags help because people search based on hashtags and if you have the right hashtag, you might want to try and create your own and you’ll have 10 views on that. Nobody’s going to search for that, right. But if you have something like, safety’s important to us and you tag it, safety first. That crowd that’s interested in safety will search that and see your posts based on that. And some people subscribe to those certain hashtags. So those are all things to be aware of, kind of make sure what’s your focus… For us, like I said, safety and make sure you’re getting that content and the right words out there so that people can find you.

 

Kip:

Yeah. And you mentioned earlier, and this is, I guess, from my executive viewpoint, it’s like, okay, my marketing leader comes to me and says, “Okay, we want to invest in social media and community building,” right. I’m just like, “Okay. Well, how do we connect the dots with business outcome?” So yeah, I’m curious about, you mentioned a few things that are very interesting, that you are measuring to web traffic, which there’s some engagement measure, there’s some awareness measure, there’s some demand generation measure. So how do you equip maybe our audience to say, “Hey, I need to convince my boss that this is a good thing and we may need to hire a person or we can maybe start with an agency,” but are there any things that you would say to really equip them to get approval to get into this area?

 

Kevin Enke:

Yeah, definitely. Kip, I think there’s two parts to any type of content website, social media. If you look at the user journey, certainly these platforms are good to get awareness out there. So you want people to understand your company, kind of prep them for what you’re about, give them examples or kind of case studies on how other people have succeeded with your product or service. That’s all great and that’s where I think impressions is kind of a leading indicator. Awareness is more important because then you see how excited your audiences is from that standpoint. And then the ultimate goal for us as a manufacturer, we’re driving them to our website and then on our website, we have buy buttons that reference our manufacturers. And so then they can go take action, either move their feet down the street and go to the store or click online and see where it’s carried or buy it online there.

So those are all things that we measure from the standpoint of product page views and then how many people actually click the buy button and how much revenue that generated. So there are systems that do more of that. And then I think that’s kind of getting into the second phase, which is more of what’s emerging is social commerce. Really exciting, I think, for people who direct to their customers and a lot of cases you can get leads.

 

If you do a campaign, for instance on LinkedIn, basically the follow up could be, have them email me rather than just go to my website and then you can follow up with them and they’re raising their hands that they’re interested. So there’s a lot of areas. And even in Facebook if you create a campaign and another kind of have a landing page that talks about that or your product page and then have them sign up there or go direct to purchase. Those are all things that are measurable and lead directly to sales or. So now, that’s becoming more commonplace that both social and web can help you drive sales directly.

 

Kip:

Sure. Well, thanks for that. And I know we’re getting to more of the end of our session. I did want to approach one other topic though. Let’s say in that scenario which you said, there’s definitely some ways to make this relevant and important to the executive team if we’re trying to invest in this as a company or building material company and tracking that back to demand generation, engagement and awareness, back to the website, and then it sounds like there’s more direct ways to do that with direct demand generation campaigns on these social channels. I know we just started trying out LinkedIn forms, which saves a step, right. They can look at what you’re doing and then fill it out directly versus clicking a few other buttons. But let’s say, the executive team’s thumbs up and they want to invest in this social community program. What would be an ideal person? Is it someone with 10 years of experience, is there a personality trait, is it out of college? Can you share about, what would be a good candidate that can help really, at least, facilitate this investment?

 

Kevin Enke:

Yeah. Kip, great question. I think first and foremost, it’s somebody who understands and embraces your company culture because in reality, they’re one of your frontline representatives for your company. And if you do social and community building right, they’re having the conversations directly with your customers which in a lot of cases doesn’t happen in a lot of other places in your company as well. So I think that’s most important, is really take the time to get them indoctrinated into your business and the culture that you have, so they can live it and then share that with your audience. Outside of that, we typically like somebody who has community management experience. A lot of times things come up and you have to make decisions on how you’re going to respond to different people and different approaches.

You’ll always have somebody, again even somebody who’s done it 10 years, that’ll learn and optimize. But ideally, if you’re getting started, at least as a baseline, we like to kind of ask the first question, do you have experience with the social media management platform like Sprout Social or or Khoros or Falcon.

 

And that tells us at least a little bit that they’ve helped manage the aspects in a midsize company. So they know the ins and outs of how to schedule and manage posts. And then, ideally, what’s great about something like this, like websites or social is, it’s measurable, right? So always ask for examples, if you’ve done this before, where you posted and what kind of stuff you posted and what kind of results you have. Like I said, I think it’s a hybrid of part art and part science. So you need somebody who’s creative enough to get the right content and good visuals together, but analytical enough to understand what’s working and what’s not.

 

Kip:

Great there Kevin. And I guess one last corollary to that, maybe I say, “Hey! Sorry, we can’t hire a person, but let’s try with an agency.” In that aspect, are there things that our listeners could ask the agency or look for to say, “Oh yeah, these guys would be really good at partnering for kind of a social community strategy.” And again, I know some of that’s based on what you just said, do they have experience or understand these social media management platforms, but anything else to add to that?

 

Kevin Enke:

Yeah. I mean, the one of the classic phrases is, what gets measured, gets done, right? So I think if you’re going to work with an agency, one of the great things about working with agencies is, they have experience across a bunch of different groups and industries even, and they can bring you some unique best practices that maybe you couldn’t get from the inside. But also that’s where you have to kind of watch, where they’re working on other industries, you know your industry best. So if you’ve got to work with an agency, get one that’s done it before, one that could bring unique ideas, but if you have your strategy and your audience clearly defined and work with them on that, then you can get pretty successful results to get started there.

 

Kip:

Do you recommend that they would need to be a domain expert in what you’re doing?

 

Kevin Enke:

I don’t think they need to necessarily know your industry. If you have somebody that’s working with them to understand the company culture, like I said. Just as long as they have that guidance, they’re fine. The different platforms change, if that’s what you’re asking.

 

Certainly, TikTok really was very different six months ago than it is now. Pinterest was hot and certainly is really important for certain audiences doing certain things, but for us, it’s better for builders to target homeowners, as an example and not necessarily for us to target the contractors on a platform like that. If you can tell either a direct hire or an agency, “Here’s what we’re trying to say, here’s what our company’s about and here’s who we’re targeting,” and you just hold them to that, then they can get off and running.

 

Kip:

Well, great. Well Kevin, it’s been a pleasure and I’ve learned a lot and you seem very, very impressive, obviously, with this topic. And if anyone in the audience is curious and wanted to reach out to you or your company, how could they do that?

 

Kevin Enke:

Yeah, sure. Feel free to visit our social pages, you can also reach out with any questions to me, send an email to kenke@kleintools.com, KLEIN TOOLS  Yeah. So be happy to answer any questions there and Kip, really enjoyed the conversation. Certainly, it’s a deep topic, but hopefully we encourage some people to dip the toe in and get rolling.

 

Graham:

All right, folks. That wraps us up for today’s show. So you can find our podcast on Apple podcast, Spotify and SoundCloud by searching for The Concora Corner. And if you’d like to, we’d love a rating and a short review if you listen on Apple, any feedback is appreciated on any of our shows that are coming out or just a show in general or if you just want to say hello. You can find out more about Concora and our services at www.concora.com. We’re on Facebook at facebook.com/concoraLLC. We’re on Twitter, @concora and you can find us on LinkedIn at linkedin.com/company/concora. Thank you for listening and have a great day.

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