PODCASTS

Amy Turner And Sri Deivasigamani Of Intellihot: Creating A Sustainable Commercial Building Industry

Amy Turner And Sri Deivasigamani Of Intellihot: Creating A Sustainable Commercial Building Industry

 

Kip welcomes Amy Turner and Sri Deivasigamani of Intellihot to discuss how their company is creating a more sustainable world for saving water with their tankless water heaters for commercial buildings.

 



 

 

Podcast Participants:

Graham: Product Director Concora
Kip Rapp: CEO Concora
Sri Deivasigamani: Founder and CEO of Intellihot
Amy Turner: Marketing lead of Intellihot

 

 

Graham:

Hello everyone and welcome to the Concora corner. A podcast dedicated to bringing you interviews with folks working in the AC and BPM industry. I’m one of your hosts, Graham Waldrop, a director of product here at Concora. Today, we’re talking with Sri Deivasigamani, founder and CEO of Intellihot and Amy Turner, who is the marketing lead of Intellihot. Sri and Amy go into detail about how their brand of commercial tankless water heaters are changing the game in terms of efficiency, as their heaters are 40% more efficient than traditional heating methods and dramatically reduces the costs of water heating. We hope you enjoy today’s interview with Sri and Amy, but before we begin, here’s a quick word from our CEO Kip Rapp.


Kip:

I wanted to thank everyone again for listening to our podcast. And if you’re interested in knowing more about Concora, we help building product manufacturers get specified and purchase more by providing a great web experience that’s bolted onto your website. It makes it easy for your architects, engineers, and contractors to do business online with you. We sum it up as three things. It’s providing a good web experience, good content and good tools. And we have some great tools such as submittals, sustainability, project showcases, or anything else needed by your design community to specify and purchase products. We’d be more than happy to show you a quick demo and you can go to concora.com to learn more, read case studies and see how other customers have grown sales with our partnership.

Well, thanks Sri and Amy for joining our podcast today, I was definitely looking forward to talking to y’all because it’s… I’ve talked to a lot of folks from sales to marketing leaders, but it’s an honor just to talk to people that are founders and having an idea and moving forward on it, and your relationship to sustainability and to innovation. So I’m just really looking forward to being able to discuss that with you today, and what your product does and what your company does. And normally how we start, Sri and Amy, maybe we can start with Sri. You can introduce yourself and what your company does and we can introduce Amy right after that.

 

Sri Deivasigamani:

Okay, that sounds good. Well, Kip, thank you for the invite and very nice to be here. My name is Sri Deivasigamani, I’m the founder and CEO of Intellihot. Started this company just over 10 years ago, completely from scratch. Like millions of Americans, my home also got flooded by a leaky water heater, and I realized how much of energy we have been wasting and how much of stored water we have. And so, fast forward a few years later, we’ve built this company that’s really pioneering a new way to think about heating and delivering water. Something totally different from, let’s say the last 100 years.


Amy Turner:

I’m Amy Turner, I’m the marketing lead at Intellihot. And I try to get our target consumers to know who we are and what we do.


Kip:

That’s awesome. Thanks for introducing yourselves. So, as I was talking to you earlier, I was very clueless about other than a consumer, a water heater. I know there’s this thing in my house, it’s dangerous. And it’s a big thing, it gets heated. And then I recognized that there was alternatives to that. And you mentioned Sri, which I guess from a consumer side, what’s the difference between tankless and traditional water heaters? And why are traditional water heaters I guess, more prevalent today versus tankless?


Sri Deivasigamani:

Well Kip, the story goes back almost 150 years ago. I think as we had the industrial revolution and then we wanted [inaudible 00:04:20] comfort, it was quite apparent that we wanted conditioned water, specifically water that’s tempered and very comfortable. And so, if you look back about 150 years ago, people said, “You know what, the best way to heat water is kind of how we are doing it back then.” Which is to put it in a large container and light a fire underneath.

And they’ve since expanded on that. It’s just a larger container. The fire is a little bit better, the paint is a little bit better. But fundamentally we are using what we have been using from 150 years ago, which whether it is your house, my house, or [inaudible 00:05:01], or the house of most Americans, or our hotels, hospitals, schools, churches, restaurants, everywhere you store a quantity of water, and then you have something heating it 24/7. In fact America stores so much water that is kept hot 24/7, it is the same as one sixth of Lake Tahoe. You know how large Lake Tahoe is. You keep about a sixth of Lake Tahoe hot 24/7, and then you siphon off a tiny quantity from it, for your use every day. So the real question is, why are we keeping all this water hot, and then nobody is really using all of it? And we’re just simply burning energy and sending it outside. So it seemed like a pretty big waste.


Kip:

Yeah, and I appreciate that because as you mentioned, whatever this started, it becomes the status quo and it becomes the way to build things. And maybe people don’t go back and think about a better way of doing it. And I do hear that across other kinds of products, like the HVAC unit, for example, and I hear a lot of stories around that. Or fossil fuels versus electricity and fireplaces and all these other things. So when did you realize that there’s a different way? You mentioned you had a leaky boiler maybe that was your Newton moment or the Apple?


Sri Deivasigamani:

Well, I had… Unfortunately I’m an engineer, I’m a mechatronics engineer. And when I looked at my water heater, I saw two pipes go in, one was cold and one was hot. And I thought, “Well I am sure this, when I opened my faucet and it comes on, it must be heating water.” Till it leaked and flooded my basement. Unfortunately like most Americans, I did not have a clue on it actually ran for 24 hours. Because there are so quite well disguised. It just sits there in your basement or wherever in your closet, and then it just quietly runs 24/7, and you really don’t think about it much. And so that was my… When it leaked, I had just come back from a very long flight. And so I was vacuuming water at one o’clock at night thinking, “Why do I have this big bathtub in my basement that seems to be full of hot water?”

So it started then, and quickly realized that not only does it store and it’s a danger to your own house in many ways, because it can leak and flood, plus it harbors bacteria because it’s essentially is stagnant water that is there, plus it runs 24/7. It’s a complete lose, lose game overall.


Kip:

Yeah. And this was in the mid-2000.


Sri Deivasigamani:

Yeah. This was around 2007, 2008. And then very quickly my friend, who is my business partner now and our chief technology officer, we were working on autonomous motorcycles at the time. And we were trying to figure out, “How can we make our bikes go faster or better shift gears.” And then it seemed like a really good idea saying, “Why don’t we take all the smarts we’ve developed, put it on because this really, for lack of better word, dumb water heater. And let’s see whether it can heat on demand, whether it can understand how I consume water, whether it can heat water and deliver it up to my faucet.”

It’s not complicated, it’s quite simple when you think about these ideas. But nobody had really done it before. And very soon we realized heating water and doing it reliably and consistently was a tough challenge. So we built our heat exchanger, our controls, and our learning algorithms, all from scratch. And so, that’s how the journey began. And what is interesting is, in order to rethink the space… I mean, everybody thinks about it as a device.

Now, if I told you, “Look, this device that you’re using could play a significant role in your health and wellness, not only your wallet, but your health and wellness.” Suddenly you become more attuned to it. So we looked at the space as, what are the other technologies that are outside?

We have zero background in water heating, none until that time. So we looked at this totally different. Heating it on demand, delivering it on demand. Learning human behavior. Thinking about pathogens, how to mitigate them. Thinking about water quality, water scale. So all brand new ideas. We started with a clean sheet of paper and quite honestly, we in a sense had the luxury to do so because we started with the idea, “This can’t be that hard. We can figure this out in a week.”


Kip:

So it was a little harder?


Amy Turner:

Well, I think also the edge they had was, they were focused on progress over profits. And when most companies start it’s, “Where’s the niche. What’s the need I can fill to make the money?” And it was more of… He was being modest about working on his motorcycle. He’s brilliant and he owns a lot of patents, as he invented a lot of things. He’s got a lot of expertise in a lot of areas.


Kip:

Oh, that’s amazing. And for me, I’m curious, because I’m like your average consumer may be below average on understanding these things. So for the heater… Because I realized this the other month, our heater had a controller and this thing broke and it was overheating the water, and the water has to stay heated throughout the pipes so that the bathroom can have hot water within 10 seconds or something. So how do you solve that problem? Because obviously you don’t have this tank of hot water now. So is it a matter of heating it faster? Or what is the general way of solving that problem?


Sri Deivasigamani:

Yeah, it’s quite simple. So first off, we solved the problem of storing large quantities of water. So we’ll just eliminate it and we’ll just heat. Whenever you open the faucet, we can detect it and then we heat on demand. And that immediately does two things. One is you’re not wasting water. B, by not storing water and having stagnant water, there is no bacteria growing in water. So if for example, you look at your garden hose, if you stick your pinky inside, you’ll see the slimy stuff. That’s unfortunately pretty much what grows in your tank.

 

Kip:

I don’t do that Sri.


Sri Deivasigamani:

Yeah, well-


Kip:

Once a week I do that.


Sri Deivasigamani:

What kind I say. Once a week? Yeah. I tell my kids not to drink from the garden hose. But yeah, it’s this a biofilm that grows because water is stagnant and has been sitting idle for a while. And so by heating on demand you eliminate that. And then you obviously don’t waste the energy.

And then with respect to getting instant water, essentially we can learn… Human beings fortunately, or unfortunately are quite predictable. We all get up in the morning, nobody sleeps doing the day. Take shower, brush your teeth. So we can actually learn your behavior patterns and then decide when to heat water. And then we can even bring that water right up to your faucet, through a very simple self-learning logic and pump. And then, so when you open your faucet you get immediate hot water. And why that is interesting Kip is, for a city, let’s say a small city, a typical average American city, let’s say 200,000 people, that entire city would waste about three swimming pools of water every day just getting water up to your faucet. Because as you know most of us in the past have, we open our faucets and wait there for 30 seconds, 45 seconds.

But we are quite good. We’ll try to grab the toothbrush, grab the towel, do this or that. So it doesn’t look like we’re wasting our time but we are wasting water. And the city and the community has to put in this large… They have to provide the clean water upfront, and then they have to clean that water that goes down the drain. So that’s a loss to society as a whole, and it’s just expensive.


Kip:

I did appreciate your story Sri, on what your technology does. And it’s impressive use of being able to heat water in an optimal way that is very much better than the traditional, having a lot of water. Which as you mentioned, stores a lot of bacteria, it’s an efficient, a lot of energy use. And your ability to intelligently like hence the name of your company, is able to understand heating patterns of the consumer in the commercial building, where you can then turn up or turn down that heating environment. So that’s really awesome.

But as you mentioned earlier, Sri that your version of the tankless water heater and the technology they had didn’t exist. But tankless as a product category, did that exist back then?


Sri Deivasigamani:

Yeah. So tank the concept I think is very easily understood because it makes sense. Tankless by itself has been around for quite some time. In fact, you would see it being offered today in the residential sector. But what we don’t see much on the commercial sector well, and it’s true even in the residential, is there’s virtually no tankless when you think about a large school or a hospital or hotel. And so it’s very common to go to the mechanical rooms of your local McDonald’s or your local Marriott, Hilton, Hyatt. And in the past they will really have lots of storage 6,000 gallons, 10,000 gallons.

And then, what is even more interesting is because for a lot of these businesses and I’m only using these guys as examples, but they are pretty much the same everywhere. What is interesting is people would double up the equipment needed because hot water is a critical need for all these businesses. And so if you really need only one tank, people will put in two tanks because the thinking was, “Well, if one heater goes down, I have another one to keep my business open.” While that seems like a good idea, what really has happened is you suddenly doubled the space requirement. You’ve double your spend, and obviously both units are running and you’ve doubled your operating costs. And worst of all, when you have two units running at the same time, they don’t necessarily last you twice as long. In fact, they both fail about the same time within a couple weeks, a couple of months of each other. So in the end, all we have bought for ourselves is maybe a couple of weeks off a heads-up and that’s about it.


Kip:

Yeah. Understood. And as you were finding the company and making changes to tankless water heating, and I know you have a focus on the commercial side, what were the challenges of trying to get your version of the product in there? Because I imagine you have engineers and you have contractors and they’re like, “This is new to me.” So what were some of those early things that were challenges? And what worked out well? Were you able to adopt this more and more into the commercial building projects?


Sri Deivasigamani:

Yeah. So again, like I said we thought about this space in a very new manner. And we said, “Look the equipment has to work in the rigors of commercial applications.” Where if you run for nine months at a commercial application, that’s the same as running for about 11 years in a residential application. There is so much ware and tear in commercial.

And so whatever we build A, has to be Bulletproof. B, it has to not waste energy. We don’t want bacteria as well. And then C, we wanted to not put in more equipment than as needed. So we didn’t want to put in double the equipment, which is currently the practice. And so to achieve all this, we developed something called a modular

approach. And we thought about these things as little robots, all coming together. And so we introduced a modular concept inside our units. And when you open up our box, externally it looks very simple. It’s just cold water goes in, out comes hot water. But internally they have a… we think of them as really robots. You have a bunch of robots that talk to each other and then as the building’s load goes up or down, more of them will click on.

From a contractor perspective, it actually simplifies what they have to do. Because now they don’t have to bother about installing pumps and tanks and other things. It’s actually quite an easy install for them, just water in and out and plumbing and electric power.


Kip:

And since you began and the adoption of what you’ve done, so what you’re saying is reducing the infrastructure for one. Because it sounds like you’re solving it through technology versus physical or redundant, big other heaters. And then with your contractors, did they have any reservation as far as, “This is new. How do you design this in?” Or even with the architects or engineers, were there… Normally those are traditional hurdles that I’ve here with people that have the new technologies.

It’s like, how do you educate that architect, that that engineer that, “Hey, this is not so bad. This is actually a better way of doing business.”


Sri Deivasigamani:

Yeah. And they have a good reason to be skeptical, because the customers they serve, whether it’s Marriott, Hilton, Hyatt, these customers really depend on hot water to keep their business open. And because over generations, we have done something the same way and people know, “Well I put in the system, it’ll last me a couple of years, I don’t have to worry about it. So my father and my grandfather, and the senior most engineer in my firm has all done this. So I don’t want to be the first one to take some kind of risk.” Totally understandable.

And so what we did is we would should them data and facts, about how the machine operates and lots of case studies where the unit has operated and done quite well. In fact, if you are one of those companies that collect enormous amount of data on how buildings uses water, and we were really able to show them it is quite possible to put in a system that heats on demand and here’s how to do it. We’ve also developed… our units now have accumulated 450 million hours of operation. And so we have a terrific track record on being able to point examples and say, “Yes, this type of technology is able to work in a skyscraper. It is also able to work in your local restaurant. It works in your local school.”

We now have thousands of installations. And it has really hit a critical mass where more and more people can see that it works and they believe it’s the right solution.

 

Kip:

That’s great. And am I reading into that, that with your product… Because I don’t hear that often Sri, is that you’re able to in real time take operational performance data and then use that, I guess as an aggregate or at least optimize the building and then use it as an aggregate for either case studies or for global optimization of some sort?


Sri Deivasigamani:

Yeah, all the above. Initially we would go out to buildings and really collect data to understand what is consumed. One of the big fears out there was, tankless systems cannot meet the large demands of a building.

And people would say, “Look, I’m going to open my hotel, everybody’s going to take a shower. And so I really need those 3000 gallons of water stored and I have to keep it hot.” So we would show them data that, “Yes people do take showers, but here’s how you can put a on demand system to meet that peak load.” And we’ve gotten so good at that, that when engineers use our calculator, the company makes a pledge that, “If our sizing does not hold good, we would provide additional equipment at no cost.” And we’re not talking about equipment that’s cheaper, it could really be hundreds of thousands of dollars. We have not had to use that guarantee even once. So, all of that comes back to really our ability to understand how buildings use.

And so we can do very accurate sizing, no matter what your building type is. And then we can help you really make that leap from current technology to on demand.


Kip:

Oh, that’s great. And Amy, I know we’re talking a lot about the product and I do want to spend some time on the marketing side, because I hear a lot of great value and innovation in solving a lot of these problems from the infrastructure to the just-in-time. And then as we mentioned, being able to show through facts and data that this is a product and a technology that can be used for large commercial buildings. And from a marketing side, because I think that’s the other half of the battle and very important part is, what do you message and how can you really tell that story? And what have you focused on? We can start with the message and then we can maybe talk about the channels that you focused on.


Amy Turner:

Well, the message is clear and the message is always evolving, especially in the 21st century. So we have the ability to reach people on a digital level that we didn’t really 10 years ago. And for me, it’s about trying to take this really analytical, really engineer-y information and language, and package it in a way that’s easily consumable in 10 seconds online. Where you’re scrolling and you stop because it’s caught your eye and it’s interesting. Or, you have to be everywhere all the time because everybody has different concerns. But sustainability and emission reducing is really important right now, and it’s only going to get more important.

And it’s a big part of why this company was founded and what sets us apart from others. So we spend a lot of time on that, bringing home that message, but it’s a multi-channel approach.

So we’re doing digital advertising and Google advertising, and we’re all over social media every day on every channel. And we do little things like this, a podcast, an editorial here and there. It’s not easy to change minds and we’re new to a space where there is so much experience and history, and there’s been so much marketing done by other tank type water heater companies that have been around for 75 years. So they have the luxury of having a brand awareness already and a built-in customer base, where we’re carving out our niche. And it’s a slow and steady wins the race, I hope. So that’s sort of the approach is, we don’t know everything about everything, but we do know we want to be seen as experts in this field because we’ve created this field.


Kip:

Oh, that’s awesome. I heard a lot of great things there from taking a complex product in one way and simplifying it into an elegant message that your potential buyer can understand. I think a lot of companies get challenged there. They talk a lot about the inside-out approach and it’s apparent that you look at it the other way around. And then you said something about focusing on… It is definitely a big thing nowadays is, sustainability and zero carbon emissions and all that. And so what’s an example Amy then of simplifying the message that maybe you can share?


Amy Turner:

Well, so like Sri said, they spend a lot of time collecting data and analyzing data. But we have to cut down to what is the message? What is the problem and the solution? So what I need to do is speak to the person at their problem level and offer the solution to their problem. And because we’re in so many different verticals, it can be different for each one. A lot of things people don’t think about say, in the healthcare industry, about the bacteria that their stored water is growing. And you know that because you can go to a pond anywhere and see the growing in it. Anytime you have water that is sitting, you’re going to grow that. But I don’t know that enough people understand the correlation between the two, how that bacteria in your water gets into your air in the building and causes problems.

So we’re focused on that. We’re working on a few new projects in Legionella mitigation and prevention, so that we can head that off at the past. But basically what I do is, I focus on what matters to them. So if they can reduce 40% of their operational costs. So while we have scores of data and charts and spreadsheets, the point of the matter is you’re heating water all day, and you’re using it for about 20 minutes. That just makes sense to people. So then they can dig in deeper and know, hopefully they contact us or a salesman and dig into what the actual use of theirs is and how they can actually benefit in dollars and cents. But that’s really what it boils down to, is boiling down to what the root of the problem is and what the root of our solution is.


Sri Deivasigamani:

I think that’s an excellent point, Amy that you’ve made. With COVID, buildings are being turned off and buildings are not designed to be turned off. And so suddenly all these buildings which have these water flowing continuously because water is consumed, they’ve all come to a grinding halt. And all of a sudden you’re seeing a huge spike in the number of Legionella cases. In fact, even the CDC had a Legionella outbreak. And just the other day, I saw a study came out of China and China wasn’t in lockdown for that long. That 20% of Legionella cases are being misdiagnosed as COVID because the symptoms are so similar, they both look like pneumonia.

And so we think that as the US starts to open up buildings, there’s going to be more and more Legionella outbreaks. And it’s really going to bring a lot of visibility to this problem that has been with us for quite some time.


Kip:

No, that’s a great point. And that ability to really position your product in a way that matters to either the transient problem at hand, like you mentioned there Sri, or to a larger objective or problem, like Amy mentioned, with either sustainability, bacteria, power consumption. So that’s I think, great examples of how you’re really able to create these poignant messages that educate your buyer, that’s very important and then can really establish the value of your product. So that’s great. And I know Amy, we talked about… And maybe this is a question for Sri is this Neuron product.

I thought that was awesome, were part of the challenge is… I remember we were talking about Amy, is that even if they’re convinced with the value, maybe the retrofitting of the product is maybe cost prohibitive. And listening to that problem, then it sounded like this Neuron product that came out with about a year ago, made it that much easier for you to have people use this better technology and product. So maybe Sri, can you walk us through what this Neuron product does and how that is a net benefit add versus maybe your other products that you offer?


Sri Deivasigamani:

Sure. So the Neuron is a terrific product, it is built on everything we know about the commercial space. And what we did there was, we developed a format that allowed you to adopt tankless pretty much overnight. Previously, one of the hurdles is, when a tank water heater fails, because businesses have to be up and running, they will simply install another tank with the connection fittings in the right spot, because that’s the fastest way to get your business up and running. So with the Neuron, we developed in and out fittings and the locations at the same spot. So you could take out your existing tank and put a Neuron in, and since the Neuron actually weighs half as much, you can actually do the install even faster.

And then what we did is we also added cellular connectivity. So when the product is installed, we can immediately see it on our phone and we are better able to support our customers.


Kip:

That’s awesome. So is that, I guess one other part to the product itself? Because we talked a lot about the benefits, it’s differences to not only traditional water heaters, but other tankless water heaters. How’s the cost? Is there other things that prohibit this? Is there a value chain from delivery? A cost side to it, a quality side to it? Anything like that might be something that might be maybe challenges before, but not as true today?


Sri Deivasigamani:

Yeah. In fact, we offer tremendous value proposition, because of our modular approach. And let’s just use the Neuron as an example. A typical restaurant would have two tank heaters occupying a six by eight type of room. The Neuron would essentially replace two tank heaters with one of our units. It still has multiple engines inside, so it gives you a redundancy and backup, but then it frees up almost 80% space. So you could allocate that space for some kind of revenue generating activities. From a cost perspective because we are replacing two for one, a lot of times we are either at the same cost or almost 50% lower. From my operational expense, we are again, 30 to 70% lower. And then obviously we free up a lot of space.

So it’s an all-round win. Traditionally, the thinking about energy efficiency and sustainability has always been, “If I have to do anything green, I have to spend more. I have to install something that is possibly bigger, cost more, takes me 20 years.” In this case, our product is totally the opposite. It actually costs you less to own, less to operate and occupies less space.


Kip:

Well, that’s amazing.


Amy Turner:

And a longer lifespan.


Kip:

And a longer lifespan.

And you mentioned one other thing before was, the performance is you said, just as good as like for those large hotels, where they want hot water on demand. And that’s also, I guess another sometimes challenge that people think about with new technology as well. It might be great at this niche area, but for large commercial use, it may fall down a bit. But like you were saying earlier, that’s not the case.


Sri Deivasigamani:

Oh, no, it’s actually… even the performance is better. Because what happens is, with that the large tanks, they are powered by large burners. And a lot of times when people use water, the burners don’t come on till a sufficient quantity of water is depleted. And then the burners will come on at full speed. And suddenly you have a rapid increase in temperature. All this can cause temperature inconsistency. And some of the most common things we hear from our customers are, “Hey, after we put in your system the water actually feels nicer and the water temperature is more consistent.”


Kip:

Oh, that’s great. And are you mostly commercial or is it split between residential and commercial?


Sri Deivasigamani:

Yeah we are pretty 100% commercial today, commercial and industrial. But the company is working on additional technology that will launch into the residential space. And again, when we are ready to launch that product, it’s going to be a total game changer. We don’t think about that space as, ‘Let me just develop a slightly better water heater or a slightly better filter, or a slightly better or something.” We are going to come into that space with radically different ideas. One that’ll help us get to 2030 goals. And we can’t get to any of those goals if you have solid thinking and think of minor improvements, rather than a radical change.


Kip:

Wow. That’s exciting. And in the commercial side Sri, is your ideal relationship with the engineer, with the building owner, with the contractor, or is it equally across those?


Sri Deivasigamani:

Yeah, all of them are very important to us. Obviously, the customer is the one who pays the bill. And so I’d like to think we all, include the engineers and the contractors and the manufacturer, worked for the end customer. And so we keep our end customer in mind. And to that end, we have developed solutions, which again, if you go to our website, we have a technology called a TelliBot AI.

And what that is, is we think of that as Alexa for the commercial world. It’s a little box that’s the size of a shoe box. And in that box we have packaged in a lot of AI temperature sensing, flow sensing, leak. And we can send this little box to 50, 100 of our customers, and it can monitor whatever water heater or boiler they have. And then we are able to actually predict how the unit is doing, and how long will they have before they have a problem. So we really focus on what our customer wants which is, they want something that is reliable.

They also want to know, “Whatever I have today, even though it may not be Intellihot, when is it going to break and when am I going to have an issue?” So we have provided that solution. And a lot of fleet customers, somebody who has 50, 100 properties, can pretty much overnight centralize their systems and then cut down business risk.


Kip:

So you mentioned Alexa, so they can talk to it?


Sri Deivasigamani:

Yeah. No, it’s like, Alexa. It essentially… Let’s say in your house, we send you our TelliBot AI. You can install it within 10 minutes, and then it’ll essentially start monitoring your water heater and your furnace. And then within a week, it will be able to tell you based on how you’re operating your water heater, how much remaining life is left. So.


Kip:

That’s awesome. Yeah.


Sri Deivasigamani:

Yeah. So if you had a business, you can avoid those emergencies. And by avoiding those emergencies can mean hundreds of thousands of dollars of loss of revenue, I guess, in this case that would be able to recover those revenues. Prevention you from losing those revenues.


Kip:

Yeah, that’s just amazing. And I know we’re running to the end of our session, but I really applaud what you and Amy and the rest of company is doing. It’s very exciting to be able to solve noble problems in the world and change for the better, based on innovation. And I do think a lot of people do it in their own ways through… as we discussed earlier. And I think what you guys are doing is just amazing. And it’s also probably very challenging because you have to not only invent, have those ideas, but you have to put the product together and then the trials and errors that you have.

So great stuff there all together. And thank you for your story, how you founded the company and how you were able to find a problem based on I guess, your with the motorcycles and that event that you had with the water heater, and just that journey to where you are today. And just focusing on what’s the real underlying problems and objectives with not only the commercial building, but with sustainability and health, that’s just great.

And that ability to message it in a great way, Amy, where it’s not sounding too complicated or technical, and it really hits on that particular vertical. So as you mentioned, like health care, if it’s a commercial building or a high rise, so that’s awesome stuff there.

So if folks needed to contact you or your company, Amy, how could they do that?


Amy Turner:

Intellihot.com.


Kip:

Intellihot.com. Good stuff there. I look forward to talking to you again, guys. It’s been great.


Sri Deivasigamani:

Yeah


Amy Turner:

Thanks Kip, appreciate it.


Sri Deivasigamani:

Thank you Kip very nice to talk to you. Just remember, we are here because we are not a water heating company, so I’ll leave you with those parting words.


Graham:

All right, folks that wraps us up for today’s show. So you can find our podcast on Apple podcast, Spotify and SoundCloud, by searching for the Concora corner. And if you’d like to, we’d love a rating or a short review, if you listen on Apple. Any feedback is appreciated on any of our shows that are coming out, or just the show in general, or if you just want to say hello. You can find out more Concora and our services at www.concora.com. We’re on Facebook at facebook.com/concoraLLC. We are on Twitter @Concora, and you can find us on LinkedIn at linkedin.com/company/concora. Thank you for listening and have a great day.

Search All Articles

Share This Article

Be Our Guest Podcast Speaker

podcast Speaker

Recent Podcast

Want to grow your commercial sales with us? Click on Book A Demo Today!